Abbot DD- 184 - History

Abbot DD- 184 - History


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Abbot I

(DD–184: dp. 1,306, 1. 314'4 1/2", b. 30'11'A", dr. 9'3 5/8", s.33.2 k.; cpl. 122; a. 4 4", 2 3", 12 21" tt.; el. Wickes)

Abbot (DD–184) was laid down on 5 April 1918 by the Newport News Shipbuilding & Drydock Co., Newport News, Va. Iaunched on 4 July 1918 sponsored by Miss Louise Abbot, great granddaughter of Commodore Abbot, and commissioned on 19 July 1919, Lt. Comdr. W. N. Richardson, Jr., in command.

Based at Norfolk, Va., the destroyer operated along the east coast and in the Gulf of Mexieo and the Caribbean, especially in Cuban waters. The destroyer was placed out of commission at the Philadelphia Navy Yard on 5 July 1922.

After being laid up for almost two decades, Abbot was recommissioned on 17 June 1940 and patrolled alone the east coast until going out of commission onee more at Halifax, in Nova Scotia, on 23 September 1940 to be transferred to England under terms of the agreement by which the United States exchanged 50 overage destroyers for bases on British colonial territory in the Atlantie. Abbot was struck from the Navy list on 3 January 1941.

Renamed Charlestown, the destroyer was assigned to the 17th Destroyer Division and arrived at Belfast, Ireland, on 8 October. She took part in several minelaying operations along the west coast of Seotland. In September 1943 Charlestown was allocated to the Rosyth Escort force to escort convoys along the east coast of Great Britain.

Charlestown was damaged in a collision with steamer Florizel off Harwich, England, in December 1944. Due to her age, it was decided not to repair her, and the destroyer was placed in reserve at Grangemouth, Firth of Forth. Charlestown was decommissioned on 15 January 1945 and was eventually scrapped.


Tencent

Tencent Holdings Ltd., also known as Tencent, is a Chinese multinational technology conglomerate holding company. Founded in 1998, its subsidiaries globally market various Internet-related services and products, including in entertainment, artificial intelligence, and other technology. [3] Its twin-skyscraper headquarters, Tencent Seafront Towers (also known as Tencent Binhai Mansion) are based in the Nanshan District of Shenzhen.

Tencent is the world's largest video game vendor, [4] as well as one of the most financially valuable companies. [5] It is among the largest social media, [6] venture capital, and investment corporations. [7] [8] Its services include social network, music, web portals, e-commerce, mobile games, internet services, payment systems, smartphones, and multiplayer online games. [9] Offerings in China include the instant messengers Tencent QQ and WeChat, and one of the largest web portals, QQ.com. [10] It also owns the majority of Global's music services (Tencent Music Entertainment), with more than 700 million active users and 120 million paying subscribers.

The company surpassed a market value of US$500 billion in 2018, becoming the first Asian technology company to cross this valuation mark. [11] [12] [13] It has since then emerged as the most valuable publicly-traded company in China, and among the world's top technology companies by market value. [14] [15] [16] Tencent has been credited as one of the world's most innovative companies by the Boston Consulting Group and Fast Company respectively. [17] [18] [19] [20] It has stakes in over 600 companies, [21] and began focusing on tech start-ups in Asia in 2017. [22] TechCrunch characterized Tencent's investment strategy as letting its portfolio startups operate autonomously. [23]


Asbestos Exposure on the USS Abbot (DD-184)

This Wickes-class Destroyer was built by the Newport News Shipbuilding and Drydock Company shortly after World War I, and was commissioned by the U.S. Navy in July 1919. Measuring 314 feet in length, the ship carried a complement of 122 officers and men.

The Abbot served mainly in the Atlantic, Caribbean, and the Gulf of Mexico during the relatively peaceful years following the war, and was taken out of service in 1922. The vessel did not see active duty for the better part of the following two decades, until the outbreak of the Second World War, when it was placed back into service on June 17, 1940.

Its tenure in the U.S. Navy during World War II was short however, as the ship was transferred to Great Britain several months later. It was struck from the Naval Vessel Register in January 1941.

Those who served aboard the USS Abbot were likely exposed to asbestos during the course of their regular duty. From the 1930’s to the mid-1970’s, asbestos was commonly used in equipment on Navy ships, and could be found in boilers, turbines, pumps, valves, and electrical components.

Materials such as gaskets and packing were also often made from asbestos. These asbestos products were held in a high concentration in the boiler and engine spaces of these ships, putting Machinist’s Mates, Boiler Tenders, and others who worked in these areas at additional risk.

While the companies who provided the Navy with these products were often aware of the health risks, they did nothing to warn those who served on the USS Abbot or other ships of the time. As a result, incidences of mesothelioma amongst Navy veterans are significantly higher than that of the general population.

Veterans who have fell victim to mesothelioma or other asbestos-related illness have a right to seek compensation. The extraordinary costs of medical care can often be covered in part or full by settlements, and victims may be entitled to receive additional sums for pain and suffering.

The law limits the time in which a lawsuit may be filed however, so it is important to contact legal counsel soon after receiving a diagnosis.


DD-184 Abbot

The first Abbot (DD-184) was launched 4 July 1918 by Newport News Shipbuilding and Dry Dock Co., Newport News, Va. sponsored by Miss Louise Abbot Cooke, great-granddaughter of Commodore Abbot, commissioned 19 July 1919, lieutenant Commander W. N. Richardson, Jr., in command and reported to the Atlantic Fleet.

Abbot cruised along the Atlantic coast, in the Gulf of Mexico, and in Cuban waters until going out of commission 5 July 1922 at the Philadelphia Navy Yard.

Recommissioned 17 June 1940, Abbot patrolled along the east coast for a brief time. She was decommissioned at Hailifax, Nova Scotia, 23 September 1940, and was transferred in the destroyer-land bases exchange to the British who renamed her HMS Charlestown.

HMS Charlestown. joined the 17th Destroyer Division and took part in minelaying operations from the west coast of, Scotland. Between assignments of' minelaying duty she assisted in the escort of convoys. Damaged in collision with the steamer Florizell off Harwich, England, during December 1944, she was reduced to reserve at Grangemouth, Scotland, and paid off from 15 January 1945 to be scrapped.


Contents

World War II Edit

The destroyer completed outfitting at Boston by 13 May when she reported to the Commander, Destroyers, Atlantic Fleet, for shakedown training. She conducted her initial training out of Casco Bay, Maine, until 18 June and, during the next three months, served as an escort for larger warships conducting their own shakedown cruises. On 10 September, Abbot departed the New England coast bound for the western Pacific. She transited the Panama Canal on 16 September and, after a brief stop at San Diego, California, resumed her voyage west on 28 September. The warship arrived in the Hawaiian Islands early in October and began additional training. However, a collision with aircraft carrier Cowpens on 18 October forced her into the Pearl Harbor Navy Yard for a repair period lasting almost three months. Abbot finally returned to sea on 10 December and briefly resumed training.

1944 Edit

In mid-December, the destroyer stood out of Pearl Harbor, bound for the Ellice Islands, and arrived at Funafuti on the day after Christmas. Training and upkeep occupied her time through the early days of January 1944. Later that month, Abbot became a unit of Task Group 50.15 (TG 50.15), the so-called Neutralization Group attached to Task Force 58 (TF 58) for the occupation of the Marshall Islands. The assignment of that task group — carried out between 29 January and 17 February was to cut off bypassed Wotje and Taroa and to prevent enemy troops and war-planes there from supporting the Japanese garrisons at Majuro, Kwajalein, and Eniwetok. Abbot joined Chester, Salt Lake City, Pensacola, and five other destroyers in frequent shore bombardments of the two atolls to keep troops occupied and planes grounded. She continued to perform that duty until 12 February at which time she began patrolling between Majuro and Kwajalein.

By the middle of March, the destroyer had been reassigned to the southwestern Pacific where she carried out convoy escort duty between the southern Solomons and the New Guinea ports of Milne Bay and Cape Sudest. In mid-April, she became an element of the screen of TG 78.2, an escort carrier group built around Coral Sea, Corregidor, Manila Bay, and Natoma Bay. The destroyer helped to protect the escort carriers from possible Japanese air and submarine attacks, while they launched their planes to provide close support for troops landing at Aitape and Hollandia on the northern coast of New Guinea. TG 78.2 ended that mission on 5 May, but Abbot remained with the escort carrier group until 7 May, when she and several other ships shaped a course for the New Hebrides Islands. She reached Espiritu Santo on 12 May.

For the next four weeks, Abbot received routine maintenance and conducted training evolutions out of Espiritu Santo. Early in June, the destroyer headed back toward the Central Pacific in company with escort carriers and other destroyers. They stopped at Kwajalein in the Marshalls to make final preparations for the assault on Saipan. On 12 June, she stood out of Kwajalein lagoon in company with TG 53.7, the Carrier Support Group built around Sangamon, Suwanee, and Chenango. The task group arrived in the Mariana Islands on 16 June. While the air groups of the three carriers provided close air support for the assault troops — first, at Saipan and, later at Guam — Abbot and her sister ships in the screen again protected the carriers from enemy air and submarine forces. She and her charges remained with the invasion force throughout the decisive Battle of the Philippine Sea in which TF 58 shattered the remnants of Japanese naval air power. About a week later, on 26 June, she and Hale joined forces to splash a Mitsubishi G4M "Betty". Through the month of July, Abbot continued to shepherd the carriers while their aviators struck targets on Saipan and Guam in support of the American invasion troops.

Early in August, Abbot returned to Pearl Harbor for repairs, relaxation, and training. On the 28th, she began preparing for another amphibious operation. She concluded that training during the second week in September and departed Hawaii on the 15th headed for the western Pacific. Steaming via Eniwetok, she arrived at Manus Island in the Admiralty Islands on 3 October. She resumed training at Manus until 14 October when she got underway with the transport screen bound for the invasion of the Philippines at Leyte. She arrived off the beaches of that island on 20 October and began providing antiaircraft and antisubmarine protection for the transport area. Though the group to which she was attached came under sporadic air attack that day, only one intruder approached near enough to Abbot for her to open up with her antiaircraft battery. However, that twin-engine bomber night. Abbot assisted the troops ashore with night illumination and harassing fire on enemy lines near Dulag.

On the morning of 21 October, Abbot retired from Leyte to escort a group of transports to Hollandia. She arrived at that New Guinea port on 26 October and remained there until 2 November when she returned to sea with a group of transports bound for Morotai in the northern Molucca Islands of the Netherlands East Indies (now part of Indonesia). She arrived at Morotai three days later and remained there for five days. During her stay at Morotai, the enemy staged frequent night air raids on the Morotai airfield but left the ships in the anchorage unmolested. However, this pattern changed after she departed the island with a Leyte-bound task group. As the group approached the Philippines, Japanese land-based air began intermittent day and night attacks. On 13 November, a Nakajima B6N "Jill" launched a torpedo in the midst of Abbot's formation but failed to score a hit. Catskill repaid this impertinence by splashing the enemy plane some 1,000 yards (910 m) ahead of Abbot. After several days at anchor off Dulag — during which time she claimed to have damaged a Yokosuka D4Y "Judy" with her 5-inch battery — Abbot got underway for Hollandia on 24 November. She arrived at that New Guinea port on 29 November and remained there almost one month. On 23 December, the destroyer weighed anchor for the Philippines in company with a small cargoman and remained at Leyte through the end of the year and into 1945.

1945 Edit

Provisioning and upkeep complete, Abbot put to sea on 2 January 1945 with TG 77.4, the Escort Carrier Group for the invasion of Luzon at Lingayen Gulf. Within that task organization, she was assigned to the screen of Rear Admiral Felix Stump's San Fabian Carrier Group. During the voyage from Leyte to Lingayen, the formation came under increasingly intense air attacks by the kamikaze corps. On 4 January, one aircraft succeeded in crashing into Ommaney Bay and damaged that escort carrier so badly that she was abandoned and sunk by a torpedo from Burns. On 6 January, the Support Carrier Group divided into its constituent units, the Lingayen and San Fabian groups. Abbot continued to provide antisubmarine and anti-air protection to the San Fabian group while aircraft from its carriers carried out prelanding bombing and strafing missions and, after the 9th, supported the invasion troops in their struggle to wrest the island from the Japanese. That duty — as well as support for the secondary landings at San Felipe and Nsugbu — lasted until 31 January. At that time, Abbot departed Lingayen Gulf in company with the carriers and headed for Mindoro.

After a week of duty at Mangarin Bay, Mindoro, Abbot set a course for Subic Bay in the screen of the carriers. From that base, she joined the carriers in supporting the assaults on the islands in Manila Bay — Corregidor, El Fraile, Carabao, and Caballo. Abbot herself destroyed a number of mines around Corregidor and captured three Japanese who attempted the swim from Corregidor to Bataan. After the 15 February paratroop landing on Corregidor, the destroyer provided call fire and night illumination fire.

On 17 February, she returned to Subic Bay for a week of replenishment and upkeep before sailing for Palawan on the 24th. In company with cruisers Denver, Cleveland, Montpelier, and three other destroyers, Abbot steamed up to support elements of the Army's 41st Infantry Division's assault on Puerto Princesa — the main port on Palawan. No gunfire from the warships was necessary, however, and they headed back to Subic Bay later that day. Abbot remained at Subic Bay in an upkeep status until 4 March when she joined another cruiser-destroyer force for the assault on Zamboanga, Mindanao. There, she acted as fire-support ship for the minesweepers as well as for the troops ashore. On 11 March, she patrolled near Basilan Island — located to the south of Zamboanga Peninsula — and destroyed enemy barges with gunfire. The following day, Abbot ' s unit completed its mission at Mindanao, headed back to Luzon, and arrived back at Subic Bay on 17 March.

After a week of upkeep and logistics there, the warship resumed missions in support of the occupation of the remaining Japanese-held Philippine Islands. On 24 March, she stood out of Subic Bay with a cruiser-destroyer force on its way to help liberate Cebu in the Visayas subgroup. Two days later, she opened fire in the prelanding bombardment at beaches some four miles (6 km) west of Cebu City. The troops went ashore around 08:30 and the warships then shifted to call fire and harassing fire. From there, she proceeded to San Pedro Bay, Leyte, escorting a mixed group of LCMs and LCIs. After her arrival at San Pedro Bay, she remained there for the rest of March undergoing a tender availability. Through most of April, the destroyer was attached to the Commander, Philippine Sea Frontier, for whom she conducted a series of missions carrying mail and passengers.

On 24 April, she was returned to the operational control of the Commander, 7th Amphibious Force. She moved to Cebu harbor where she served standby duty as fire—support ship for the Americal Division. That assignment proved relatively uneventful until the first week in May. On 3 May, she took under fire a group of houses on Nailon Point near Tobagan village, Cebu, rumored to harbor a concentration of Japanese troops. From there. Abbot moved along the coast toward Cebu harbor, firing at targets of opportunity as she went. She repeated the mission three days later and then departed Cebu on 8 May. Staged through Mindoro, the destroyer participated in the landings at Macajalar Bay on the island of Mindanao. She participated in the preparatory shore bombardment early on the 10th though it later proved to have been unnecessary when the assault troops encountered absolutely no Japanese. The ship remained in the neighborhood until the 14th to be on hand should her guns be needed. On that day, she shaped a course back to San Pedro Bay and spent the next three weeks engaged in patrols and escort missions in the southern Philippines. She concluded her Philippine service with a 10-day tender availability at Leyte.

On 12 June, the warship reported for duty with the 3rd Fleet and was assigned to duty with the fast carriers in the screen of TG 38.3. Her task group departed Leyte Gulf on 1 July bound for an operating area just to the east of the Japanese home islands, and Abbot steamed out with them. While the carriers' aircraft attacked the enemy's homeland, the destroyer joined the other escorts in protecting their mobile bases from air and submarine attack. However, on two occasions, Abbot also got in her own licks. Just after noon on 14 July, TG 34.8.1, a special force — composed of battleships South Dakota, Indiana, Massachusetts, cruisers Quincy, Chicago, Abbot, and eight other destroyers — was detached from the TF 38 screen and closed the shores of northern Honshū near the city of Kamaishi. During six bombardment passes, the force fired over 2,300 shells of various calibers into the Japan Iron Works plant located there. A second and similar mission brought TG 34.8.1 back to the shores of Honshū at Hamamatsu on 29 July. Otherwise, Abbot served in the screen of TF 38.

On 8 August, the destroyer was shifted to TG 35.4 consisting of a cruiser division and a squadron of destroyers. Their assignment was to investigate surface targets reported some 63 miles (101 km) from the main formation. While she was forming up at 32 knots (59 km/h 37 mph), her starboard propeller and a portion of her tail shaft broke off just forward of the after strut bearing. The damages forced her to rejoin the main force though she remained seaworthy, capable of 23 knots (43 km/h 26 mph), and able to maintain station in formation. The following day, when Borie suffered a kamikaze hit, Abbot rendered assistance and escorted her to a rendezvous with hospital ship Rescue to evacuate casualties and thence to Saipan for repairs. The ships arrived at Saipan on 17 August, two days after the cessation of hostilities. There, Abbot herself entered drydock where her damage was found to be sufficiently serious to warrant her retiring, via Hawaii, to the Puget Sound Navy Yard. She arrived in Bremerton, Washington, early in September. After repairs, she reported to the Commander, San Diego Group, Pacific Reserve Fleet, for inactivation. Abbot was placed out of commission on 21 May 1946 and was berthed at San Diego.

1950–1959 Edit

Abbot spent almost five years in the Reserve Fleet, before the outbreak of hostilities in Korea in the summer of 1950 brought a need for more active ships in the Fleet. Though recommissioned on 26 February 1951, the destroyer spent the next three months at the Mare Island Naval Shipyard undergoing alterations and modernization. On 1 June, she put to sea, bound for her first operational assignment since returning to active service. Instead of Korea, however, the east coast of the United States proved to be her destination. Later that month, she transited the Panama Canal and arrived in her new home port, Newport, Rhode Island For the remainder of 1951, the destroyer underwent repairs at the Philadelphia Naval Shipyard followed by refresher training out of Guantanamo Bay, Cuba. She spent the first three months of 1952 preparing for her first deployment to the Mediterranean Sea with the 6th Fleet. That assignment began in April and ended with her return to Newport in October. Abbot spent the next 19 months operating out of Newport engaged in training evolutions — antisubmarine warfare (ASW) exercises, independent ship's exercises, and refresher training.

On 1 June 1954, the destroyer departed Newport in company with Destroyer Division 242 (DesDiv 242) on what proved to be a seven-month circumnavigation of the globe. Steaming via the Panama Canal, San Diego, Oahu, and Midway, she joined the 7th Fleet at Yokosuka, Japan, and operated in the South China Sea and in the Taiwan Strait until October. On 18 October, she headed back to the United States, via the Indian Ocean, the Suez Canal, the Mediterranean Sea, and the Atlantic Ocean, making numerous port calls along the way. The destroyer arrived back at Newport on 18 December 1954 and remained in the Newport area through January 1955. In February and March of that year, the warship participated in the annual "Springboard" exercise conducted near Guantanamo Bay, Cuba. She returned to Newport in March and began normal operations — independent ship's exercises and hunter/killer antisubmarine warfare exercises — out of her home port. Save for a three-week midshipman cruise to St. Johns, Newfoundland, in August, she busied herself with normal operations for the remainder of the year.

Early in 1956, Abbot entered the Boston Naval Shipyard for a 19-week repair period. Leaving the yard on 19 May, the destroyer conducted refresher training in Cuban waters through most of June. In July, she was reassigned to Destroyer Squadron 10 (DesRon 10) along with her entire division, DesDiv 242, which became DesDiv 102. The warship spent the period from September to November either alongside a tender or in the Boston Naval Shipyard undergoing preparations for a deployment to the Mediterranean. That assignment began in November 1956 and lasted until February 1957. The destroyer returned to Newport on 22 February and, after an availability period, resumed normal exercises and type training. That summer, she made a two-month midshipman cruise that took her to Rio de Janeiro and to the West Indies. In the fall, Abbot participated in Operation Strikeback, a NATO exercise conducted in the northeastern Atlantic. During that mission, she made port visits to Belfast in Northern Ireland and to Chatham, England. Upon her return to the New England coast late in October, the ship resumed type training and exercises out of Newport and continued such duty for the rest of 1957.

On 15 January 1958, Abbot entered the Boston Naval Shipyard for her regular overhaul. After three months of repairs and modifications, she spent another month conducting refresher training out of Guantanamo Bay, Cuba. She then returned to Newport, where she spent June and the first week of July. On 11 July, she stood out of Newport bound for Annapolis, Maryland, where she embarked Naval Academy midshipmen for their summer cruise. Not long thereafter, President Camille Chamoun of Lebanon — whose country had been gripped by steadily intensifying civil strife — requested United States help in restoring order. Forces already in the Mediterranean were dispatched to his aid. Abbot and the rest of DesRon 10 escorted amphibious forces to Vieques Island and, after a stop at San Juan, Puerto Rico, headed across the Atlantic to bolster those units. She made brief stops at Gibraltar and Naples before joining TF 66 — the 6th Fleet fast carrier force — off the Levantine coast. Two weeks later, she anchored at Beirut, the Lebanese capital, to serve as gunfire support ship for the Marine Corps and Army troops operating ashore. By the end of summer, the crisis had subsided, and Abbot took up routine 6th Fleet duty until returning to Newport on Veterans Day 1958.

1959–1965 Edit

Her return to Newport brought a resumption of hunter/killer exercises in New England coastal waters. On 1 May 1959, the destroyer was transferred from DesRon 10 to Escort Squadron 14 (CortRon 14) as the squadron flagship. Her mission, however, remained antisubmarine warfare though in a more defensive rather than offensive mode. Later that month, she began an overhaul at the Boston Naval Shipyard. She completed repairs at the end of the summer and spent the month of September engaged in refresher training near Guantanamo Bay and at Culebra Island, Puerto Rico. In October, she returned north to Newport and resumed her antisubmarine warfare exercises.

That employment occupied her for the remainder of 1959 and throughout 1960. On 5 May 1961, Abbot briefly entered the race for space. Supporting the sub-orbital flight of Freedom 7, Abbot was detailed to help recover the Mercury capsule after splash-down roughly 300 miles (480 km) east of Cape Canaveral, Florida. The mission was designated MR-3, or Mercury-Redstone 3, and it was the United States's answer to the successful flight of Yuri Gagarin, the Soviet cosmonaut who became the first human in space. In September 1961, Abbot became the school ship for the Destroyer Officer's School located at Newport. Her routine of service along the east coast and in the West Indies training naval officers in their future duties on board destroyer-type warships was broken twice in 1962. In August, she was ordered to Guantanamo Bay, where she served as a base defense ship during disorders in Haiti. Then, in October, she participated in operations enforcing the quarantine of Cuba established by President John F. Kennedy after he learned that Soviet offensive missiles had been based on that island. She was released from that duty in mid-November and returned to Newport on the 24th to resume her training missions.

Abbot continued her role as a training platform for prospective destroyer officers until April 1964. On 14 April, she departed Newport for Philadelphia for her last active duty assignment. At Philadelphia, she served as a Naval Reserve training ship for almost a year and as flagship for Reserve Destroyer Squadron 30. She was decommissioned on 26 March 1965 at Philadelphia and, for the next decade, was berthed with the Philadelphia Group, Atlantic Reserve Fleet.

Struck from the Navy list on 1 December 1974, she was sold for scrapping to the Boston Metals Company of Baltimore, Maryland, in August 1975.


Military Forms

Accessing military and veteran benefits requires filling out the correct military forms. The following index of official military forms from the DoD, Army, Navy, Air Force, Marine Corps, Coast Guard, and Department of Veterans Affairs will help you access your earned benefits.

One of the most important documents you need is the DoD form known as the DD-214. Nearly every Department of Veterans Affairs benefit claim and most state veterans benefit applications require vets to submit this military form.

Getting a Replacement DD-214 or Military Service Records

Loss of this all-important form is not the end of the world. Most veterans and their next-of-kin can get free copies of their DD Form 214 Certificate of Release or Discharge from Active Duty - through the eVetRecs website or by mailing or faxing a completed Standard Form SF-180 to the National Archives.


U.S.S. ABBOT ⭑ DD 629

Abbot was a Fletcher-class destroyer built in 1943. Following naval tradition, a class of identical ships is named after the first ship of the series &mdash Fletcher , was launched in May 1942. Fletcher-class destroyers became one of the most successful weapon systems deployed in World War II, with 175 built and a few still in service around the world well after 1990. One example, the former John Rodgers , was active in the Mexican Navy until July 2001 &mdash an astonishing 59 years, 1 month and 16 days after the first Fletcher destroyer was commissioned it was also the last Fletcher destroyer to be scrapped, in 2010.

A total of 19 Fletchers were lost in World War II and another six were damaged beyond repair, a relatively high loss rate of 14%. Some Fletchers suffered terribly while protecting the fleet De Haven was bombed and sunk just 134 days after being commissioned. Nine were heavily damaged by kamikaze attacks at Okinawa.

(American submarines suffered 18% losses and there were about 10% losses among aircraft carriers. No battleships were lost after Pearl Harbor.)

Destroyer History has a good summary of the Fletchers. You can also visit one of the four Fletcher destroyers that are moored as floating museums.

We also have an excellent external overview of the main parts of a Fletcher-class destroyer.

Names and variations

Most Fletchers were named after Navy and Marine Corps heroes. Most of those sent to foreign navies after World War II were renamed, though some that were used only for spare parts kept their original American names. Six surplus Fletchers given to West Germany in the 1960s were to be used temporarily until German-made ships were available, and so instead of formal names they were given only numbers (Destroyer 1 to 6) as it turned out, most were used for nearly two decades.

Fletchers were built in two visually distinctive variations: Round-bridge (also known as high-bridge) had a curved square-bridge (or low-bridge) has a more angular pilot house that was roomier, had better visibility and was easier to fabricate no round-bridge examples remain. In addition, after World War II the mainmasts on most Fletchers were converted to tripods to better support heavier radar antennas. Photos of Fletcher-class destroyers can usually be dated by the mainmast style and the camouflage paint scheme.

Other variations included seaplane catapults (see the photo of Pringle below), a variety of post-war weapon upgrades and radar antennas. Despite the external variations, the general interior layout varied very little.

We are working on a long-term project to post a complete set of as-built blueprints for Fletcher-class destroyers of Abbot&rsquos Bath Iron Works series. You can also view an interactive blueprint of the Fletcher class as built by the Bath Iron Works in 1943 a general drawing showing Cold War modifications a preliminary 1941 design for the next class of ships and a complete booklet of general plans for another Fletcher-class destroyer, Sigsbee .

Typical class statistics, as built

  • Displacement: 2,050 tons.
  • Dimensions: 369¼&rsquo at waterline 376½&rsquo overall length 39½&rsquo beam 17¾&rsquo draft, keel to waterline.
  • Power: Two geared turbines total 60,000 horsepower, 37 knots (42½ m.p.h.).
  • Armament:
    • 5 × 5&rdquo guns
    • 10 × 40mm anti-aircraft guns
    • 7 × 20mm anti-aircraft guns
    • 10 × 21&rdquo torpedo tubes
    • 6 depth charge launchers
    • 2 depth charge racks

    Disposing of U.S. Navy ships

    Many Fletcher-class destroyers were commissioned more than once, usually as a result of the Cold War. Once stricken from the Naval Vessel Register, a ship was never again commissioned by the United States Navy. Here is what the U.S. Navy says about the fate of unwanted warships:

    • Scrapping
    • Transfer to U.S. Maritime Administration
    • Foreign transfer
    • Experimental/target
    • Donation
    • Historic memorial
    • Transfer to other government/non-government agencies
    • Navy sale

    The high cost of upkeep plus the copious use of asbestos and other toxic materials meant that most Fletchers were scrapped or intentionally sunk four remain as floating museums (in Boston Buffalo, New York Baton Rouge, Louisiana and near Athens, Greece). Bits and pieces of others are scattered worldwide for example, one of Hailey&rsquos 5-inch gun turrets is a naval gunnery monument in Brazil, and a 5-inch gun turret from a Chilean Fletcher is displayed in Viña del Mar.

    The List

    This list of major milestones is updated periodically. We have especially attempted to trace the fates of Fletchers that served in foreign navies. In some cases conflicting information make exact dates, foreign hull numbers and final dispositions difficult to ascertain. Wherever possible, we have relied upon information provided by the foreign navies.

    Ships and footnotes are listed in order of U.S. Navy hull number. Click on a hull (DD) number or photo below to see a larger image. Dates are in year-month-day format. Ships that were officially classified as &ldquowar losses&rdquo have tinted backgrounds, although some others were so severely damaged that they were later scrapped or discarded. An asterisk (*) indicates round-bridge design all others are square-bridge.

    • 1941-10-2 &mdash Laid Down, Federal Shipbuilding & Dry Dock Co., Kearny, New Jersey
    • 1942-5-3 &mdash Launched, Federal Shipbuilding & Dry Dock Co., Kearny, New Jersey
    • 1942-6-30 &mdash Commissioned at New York Navy Yard
    • 1947-1-15 &mdash Decommissioned at San Diego
    • 1949-10-3 &mdash Recommissioned at San Diego
    • 1969-8-1 &mdash Decommissioned at San Diego and stricken
    • 1972-2-22 &mdash Sold for scrap to Tai Kien Industry Co. of Sanchong City, Taipei County, and towed to Taiwan&dagger
    • 1941-10-2 &mdash Laid Down, Federal Shipbuilding & Dry Dock Co., Kearny, New Jersey
    • 1942-5-3 &mdash Launched, Federal Shipbuilding & Dry Dock Co., Kearny, New Jersey
    • 1942-7-22 &mdash Commissioned
    • 1946-1-17 &mdash Decommissioned at San Francisco
    • 1946-3-26 &mdash Reclassified as DDE-446
    • 1949-10-17 &mdash Recommissioned
    • 1962-8-2 &mdash Reclassified as DD-446
    • 1969-11-10 &mdash Decommissioned at San Francisco and stricken
    • 1970-10-1 &mdash Sold for scrap and towed to Zidell Explorations of Portland, Oregon, from Vallejo, California
    • 1941-11-27 &mdash Laid Down, Federal Shipbuilding & Dry Dock Co., Kearny, New Jersey
    • 1942-6-21 &mdash Launched, Federal Shipbuilding & Dry Dock Co., Kearny, New Jersey
    • 1942-7-31 &mdash Commissioned
    • 1946-5-1 &mdash Decommissioned at San Diego
    • 1951-1-2 &mdash Reclassified as DDE-447
    • 1952-11-2 &mdash Recommissioned at Mare Island Naval Shipyard, Vallejo, California
    • 1962-6-30 &mdash Reclassified as DD-447
    • 1969-7-2 &mdash Decommissioned at San Diego and stricken
    • 1971-2-17 &mdash Sold for scrap to Chou&rsquos Iron & Steel Co. of Kaoshiung, Taiwan&dagger
    • 1941-11-27 &mdash Laid Down, Federal Shipbuilding & Dry Dock Co., Kearny, New Jersey
    • 1942-6-21 &mdash Launched, Federal Shipbuilding & Dry Dock Co., Kearny, New Jersey
    • 1942-8-12 &mdash Commissioned
    • 1946-4-16 &mdash Decommissioned at San Diego
    • 1974-2-1 &mdash Stricken
    • 1974-7-26 &mdash Sold to Peruvian Navy for spare parts (Foreign Military Sales program)
    • 1975 &mdash Sold for scrap by Peruvian Navy
    • 1941-3-3 &mdash Laid Down, Bath Iron Works, Maine
    • 1942-2-19 &mdash Launched, Bath Iron Works, Maine
    • 1942-6-4 &mdash Commissioned at Boston Navy Yard
    • 1946-6-12 &mdash Decommissioned
    • 1949-3-26 &mdash Reclassified as DDE-449 at Long Beach, California
    • 1951-2-19 &mdash Recommissioned
    • 1962-7-1 &mdash Reclassified as DD-449
    • 1969-11-19 &mdash Declared unfit for further service
    • 1970-1-30 &mdash Decommissioned at Pearl Harbor, Hawaii, and stricken [449]
    • 1970-10-1 &mdash Sold for scrap and later towed to Zidell Explorations, Inc., of Portland, Oregon
    • 1972 &mdash Scrapped at Zidell Explorations, Inc., of Portland, Oregon
    • 2008-8-7 &mdash Ship&rsquos bell dedicated at Marine Barracks Washington, D.C.
    • 1941-3-3 &mdash Laid Down, Bath Iron Works, Maine
    • 1942-3-14 &mdash Launched, Bath Iron Works, Maine
    • 1942-6-26 &mdash Commissioned at Boston
    • 1946-5-21 &mdash Decommissioned at San Diego
    • 1949-3-26 &mdash Reclassified as DDE-450 at Long Beach, California
    • 1951-2-19 &mdash Recommissioned
    • 1962-6-30 &mdash Reclassified as DD-450
    • 1970-1-30 &mdash Decommissioned at Pearl Harbor, Hawaii
    • 1970-1-30 &mdash Stricken
    • 1970-6-6 &mdash Sold to Union Minerals & Alloy, New York, for scrap
    • 1972 &mdash Scrapped
    • 1941-4-30 &mdash Laid Down, Bath Iron Works, Maine
    • 1942-4-11 &mdash Launched, Bath Iron Works, Maine
    • 1942-6-20 &mdash Commissioned
    • 1943-10-7 &mdash War Loss damaged beyond repair by Japanese destroyer Yugomo off Vella Lavella, Solomon Islands, then scuttled by torpedo from U.S. Fletcher-class destroyer La Vallette
    • 1942-1-27 &mdash Laid Down, Federal Shipbuilding & Dry Dock Co., Kearny, New Jersey
    • 1942-7-19 &mdash Launched, Federal Shipbuilding & Dry Dock Co., Kearny, New Jersey
    • 1942-8-29 &mdash Commissioned
    • 1946-6-12 &mdash Decommissioned at Charleston, South Carolina
    • 1949-3-15 &mdash Reclassified as DDE-465
    • 1949-12-15 &mdash Recommissioned
    • 1951-1-1 &mdash Reclassified as experimental destroyer EDDE-465
    • 1962-7-1 &mdash Reclassified as DD-465
    • 1965-1-29 &mdash Decommissioned at Norfolk, Virginia, then used as test ship
    • 1966-9-1 &mdash Stricken
    • 1968-2-20 &mdash Intentionally sunk during explosives test 20 miles south of Sugarloaf Key, Florida
    • 1942-2-12 &mdash Laid Down, Federal Shipbuilding & Dry Dock Co., Kearny, New Jersey
    • 1942-8-15 &mdash Launched, Federal Shipbuilding & Dry Dock Co., Kearny, New Jersey
    • 1942-10-1 &mdash Commissioned
    • 1946-6-10 &mdash Decommissioned at Charleston, South Carolina
    • 1949-3-26 &mdash Reclassified as DDE-466
    • 1950-7-5 &mdash Recommissioned at Charleston, South Carolina
    • 1962-6-30 &mdash Reclassified as DD-466
    • 1969-7-15 &mdash Decommissioned at Norfolk Naval Base, Virginia, and Stricken
    • 1970-2-2 &mdash Authorized to be used as a target ship
    • 1970-6-17 &mdash Intentionally sunk by aircraft 150 miles south of Nantucket Island, Massachusetts
    • 1941-4-30 &mdash Laid Down, Bath Iron Works, Maine
    • 1942-5-17 &mdash Launched, Bath Iron Works, Maine
    • 1942-8-7 &mdash Commissioned at Boston Navy Yard
    • 1943-7-5 &mdash War Loss sunk by torpedoes from Japanese destroyers and shore fire off Baioko Harbor, New Georgia, Solomon Islands
    • 1943-7-15 &mdash Stricken
    • 1941-8-28 &mdash Laid Down, Bath Iron Works, Maine
    • 1942-6-7 &mdash Launched, Bath Iron Works, Maine
    • 1942-8-28 &mdash Commissioned at Boston Navy Yard
    • 1946-5-31 &mdash Decommissioned at San Diego
    • 1950-5-9 &mdash Moved to San Francisco
    • 1951-1-2 &mdash Reclassified as DDE-468
    • 1951-12-3 &mdash Recommissioned at San Francisco
    • 1962-8-7 &mdash Reclassified as DD-468
    • 1969-5 &mdash Determined to be uneconomical to upgrade
    • 1969-6-3 &mdash Decommissioned at San Diego
    • 1969-7-2 &mdash Stricken by U.S. Navy and sold to Italy
    • 1969-7-2 &mdash Commissioned into Italian Navy ( NMM Lanciere D-560) at San Diego
    • 1970 &mdash Never used for active duty immediately laid up and used as spare parts for Fante and Geniere
    • 1971-1-1 &mdash Stricken by Italian Navy and scrapped
    • 1941-9-27 &mdash Laid Down, Bath Iron Works, Maine
    • 1942-6-28 &mdash Launched, Bath Iron Works, Maine
    • 1942-9-21 &mdash Commissioned
    • 1943-2-1 &mdash War Loss bombed and sunk by Japanese aircraft off Guadalcanal [469]
    • 1941-11-19 &mdash Laid Down, Bethlehem Steel Corp., Staten Island, New York City
    • 1942-7-7 &mdash Launched, Bethlehem Steel Corp., Staten Island, New York City
    • 1942-11-14 &mdash Commissioned
    • 1946-2-4 &mdash Decommissioned at Charleston, South Carolina
    • 1951-1-2 &mdash Reclassified as DDE-470
    • 1951-10-1 &mdash Recommissioned at Boston
    • 1962-6-30 &mdash Reclassified as DD-470
    • 1968-2-6 &mdash Dragged anchor in severe storm and ran aground near Rhodes Yacht Club, Greece hull split open
    • 1968-2-17 &mdash More damage in second storm at Rhodes, Greece repeated towing attempts failed
    • 1968-2-26 &mdash Decommissioned at Rhodes, Greece
    • 1968-3-1 &mdash Stricken and scrapped on site
    • 1941-12-19 &mdash Laid Down, Bethlehem Steel Corp., Staten Island, New York City
    • 1942-8-24 &mdash Launched, Bethlehem Steel Corp., Staten Island, New York City
    • 1942-12-23 &mdash Commissioned at New York Navy Yard
    • 1946-4-11 &mdash Decommissioned at Charleston, South Carolina
    • 1951-1-2 &mdash Recommissioned at Boston as DDE-471
    • 1962-6-30 &mdash Reclassified as DD-471
    • 1968-9-30 &mdash Decommissioned at Norfolk, Virginia
    • 1968-10-1 &mdash Stricken
    • 1969-6-24 &mdash Intentionally sunk as target about 250 miles east of the mouth of Chesapeake Bay, Virginia
    • 1941-9-27 &mdash Laid Down, Boston Navy Yard
    • 1942-2-20 &mdash Launched, Boston Navy Yard
    • 1942-12-15 &mdash Commissioned at Boston Navy Yard
    • 1946-6-4 &mdash Decommissioned at San Diego
    • 1959-6-5 &mdash Loaned to Brazil
    • 1959-6-5 &mdash Commissioned into Brazilian Navy ( CT Pará D-27) at Bremerton, Washington
    • 1973-8-1 &mdash Stricken by U.S. Navy and sold to Brazil
    • 1978 &mdash Decommissioned and stricken by Brazilian Navy
    • 1983-2-22 &mdash Target for MM-38 Exocet missile fired from Brazilian Niterói-class frigate scuttled by two torpedos fired from Brazilian Balao-class submarine Ceará 80 nautical miles south of Cabo Frio lighthouse (near Rio de Janeiro), Brazil
    • 1941-12-10 &mdash Laid Down, Boston Navy Yard
    • 1942-4-16 &mdash Launched, Boston Navy Yard
    • 1943-2-9 &mdash Commissioned at Boston Navy Yard
    • 1946-4-18 &mdash Decommissioned at San Diego
    • 1959-12-15 &mdash Loaned to Brazil
    • 1959-12-15 &mdash Commissioned into Brazilian Navy ( CT Paraíba D-28) at Bremerton, Washington
    • 1973-8-1 &mdash Stricken by U.S. Navy and sold to Brazil
    • 1978 &mdash Sold by Brazil for scrap
    • 1941-12-10 &mdash Laid Down, Boston Navy Yard
    • 1942-4-16 &mdash Launched, Boston Navy Yard
    • 1943-3-2 &mdash Commissioned at Boston Navy Yard
    • 1947-1-15 &mdash Decommissioned at San Diego
    • 1957-9-1 &mdash Towed to Long Beach Naval Shipyard, California, and fitted with scientific instruments in preparation for use as target in nuclear weapons tests
    • 1958 &mdash Used as target and contaminated by radioactivity during Operation Hardtack I underwater atomic bomb tests and near Enewetak Atoll
    • 1960 &mdash Severely damaged in a series of underwater explosion tests on Chesapeake Bay near the Patuxent River Naval Air Station, Maryland
    • 1962-5-28 &mdash Determined to be contaminated by radiation and of no further use
    • 1962-6-1 &mdash Stricken
    • 1962-7-7 &mdash Intentionally sunk by Bullpup missiles and gunfire 180 miles southeast of Cape Henry, Virginia
    • 1942-2-20 &mdash Laid Down, Boston Navy Yard
    • 1942-6-3 &mdash Launched, Boston Navy Yard
    • 1943-4-13 &mdash Commissioned at Boston Navy Yard
    • 1945-5-4 &mdash Severely damaged off Okinawa while fighting fires aboard the heavily damaged escort carrier Sangamon . Repaired and returned to duty
    • 1946-5-31 &mdash Decommissioned at San Diego
    • 1947-1 &mdash Moved to Mare Island Naval Shipyard, Vallejo, California
    • 1972-12-1 &mdash Stricken
    • 1973-11-27 &mdash Sold for scrap to Zidell Explorations, Inc., Portland, Oregon
    • 1973-12-14 &mdash Scrapped by Zidell Explorations, Inc., at Tacoma, Washington
    • 1941-9-27 &mdash Laid Down, Boston Navy Yard
    • 1942-2-20 &mdash Launched, Boston Navy Yard
    • 1942-11-17 &mdash Commissioned
    • 1945-4-27 &mdash Damaged beyond repair by Japanese kamikaze speedboat off Okinawa
    • 1945-11-30 &mdash Decommissioned at Bremerton, Washington
    • 1945-12-19 &mdash Stricken
    • 1948-1-10 &mdash Sold to Learner & Co. of Oakland, California, for scrap
    • 1941-7-31 &mdash Laid Down, Charleston Navy Yard, South Carolina
    • 1942-5-2 &mdash Launched, Charleston Navy Yard, South Carolina
    • 1942-9-15 &mdash Commissioned
    • 1945-4-16 &mdash War Loss sunk by Japanese kamikaze aircraft off Okinawa
    • 1941-9-15 &mdash Laid Down, Charleston Navy Yard, South Carolina
    • 1942-5-2 &mdash Launched, Charleston Navy Yard, South Carolina
    • 1942-10-15 &mdash Commissioned at Charleston, South Carolina
    • 1945-4-12 &mdash Struck by Japanese rocket-powered suicide aircraft off Okinawa
    • 1945-9-22 &mdash Assigned to Pacific Reserve Fleet while at Mare Island Naval Shipyard, Vallejo, California
    • 1946-10 &mdash Decommissioned at San Diego
    • 1947-1-15 &mdash Moved to Long Beach, California
    • 1970-12-1 &mdash Stricken
    • 1971-12-16 &mdash Sold for scrap to Chou&rsquos Iron & Steel Co. of Kaoshiung, Taiwan
    • 1941-12-30 &mdash Laid Down, Charleston Navy Yard, South Carolina
    • 1942-6-24 &mdash Launched, Charleston Navy Yard, South Carolina
    • 1943-2-1 &mdash Commissioned at Charleston, South Carolina
    • 1946-9-28 &mdash Decommissioned at San Diego
    • 1972-12-1 &mdash Stricken
    • 1973-11-27 &mdash Sold to Zidell Explorations of Portland, Oregon, for scrap
    • 1941-6-3 &mdash Laid Down, Puget Sound Navy Yard, Bremerton, Washington
    • 1942-10-29 &mdash Launched, Puget Sound Navy Yard, Bremerton, Washington
    • 1943-4-10 &mdash Commissioned
    • 1946-5-15 &mdash Decommissioned at San Diego
    • 1968-5-1 &mdash Stricken
    • 1970-4-2 &mdash Sold for scrap to National Metal & Steel Co., Terminal Island, Los Angeles, California&dagger
    • 1941-6-3 &mdash Laid Down, Puget Sound Navy Yard, Bremerton, Washington
    • 1942-10-29 &mdash Launched, Puget Sound Navy Yard, Bremerton, Washington
    • 1944-3-4 &mdash Commissioned at Puget Sound Navy Yard, Bremerton, Washington
    • 1945-4-6 &mdash Damaged beyond repair by Japanese kamikaze aircraft off Okinawa
    • 1945-12-6 &mdash Decommissioned
    • 1946-1-3 &mdash Stricken
    • 1947-6-17 &mdash Sold to Thomas Harris of Barker, New Jersey, for scrap
    • 1942-5-7 &mdash Laid Down, Federal Shipbuilding & Dry Dock Co., Kearny, New Jersey
    • 1942-10-13 &mdash Launched, Federal Shipbuilding & Dry Dock Co., Kearny, New Jersey
    • 1942-11-21 &mdash Commissioned
    • 1947-1-1 &mdash Decommissioned at Charleston, South Carolina
    • 1949-3-13 &mdash Reclassified as DDE-498
    • 1950-6-30 &mdash Recommissioned at Charleston, South Carolina
    • 1962-7-1 &mdash Reclassified at DD-498
    • 1968-9-30 &mdash Decommissioned
    • 1968-10-1 &mdash Stricken
    • 1971-12-15 &mdash Sold for scrap to Chou&rsquos Iron & Steel Co. of Kaoshiung, Taiwan
    • 1972-2-2 &mdash Foundered in storm 400 miles east of Wake Island en route to breaker&rsquos yard on Taiwan
    • 1942-5-7 &mdash Laid Down, Federal Shipbuilding & Dry Dock Co., Kearny, New Jersey
    • 1942-10-13 &mdash Launched, Federal Shipbuilding & Dry Dock Co., Kearny, New Jersey
    • 1942-12-5 &mdash Commissioned at Federal Shipbuilding & Dry Dock Co., Kearny, New Jersey
    • 1947-2-1 &mdash Decommissioned at Charleston, South Carolina
    • 1949-3-26 &mdash Reclassified as DDE-499
    • 1950-6-30 &mdash Recommissioned at Norfolk Naval Shipyard, Virginia
    • 1962-8-2 &mdash Reclassified as DD-499
    • 1970-2-14 &mdash Decommissioned and Stricken by U.S. Navy
    • 1970-10-1 &mdash Sold to Zidell Explorations, Inc., of Portland, Oregon, for scrap
    • 1942-6-25 &mdash Laid Down, Federal Shipbuilding & Dry Dock Co., Kearny, New Jersey
    • 1942-11-11 &mdash Launched, Federal Shipbuilding & Dry Dock Co., Kearny, New Jersey
    • 1942-12-24 &mdash Commissioned at Brooklyn Navy Yard, New York City
    • 1946-3-23 &mdash Decommissioned at Charleston, South Carolina
    • 1959-7-14 &mdash Loaned to West Germany
    • 1959-7-14 &mdash Commissioned into West German Navy ( Zerstörer-2 D-171) at Charleston, South Carolina
    • 1981-9-15 &mdash Arrived at Salamis Naval Base, Greece
    • 1981-9-18 &mdash Stricken and sold by U.S. Navy
    • 1981-9-18 &mdash Decommissioned by West German Navy at Salamis Naval Base, Greece
    • 1981-9-18 &mdash Commissioned into Greek Navy ( A/T Kimon [&Alpha/&Tau &Kappa&iota&mu&omega&nu] D-42) at Salamis Naval Base, Greece
    • 1987 &mdash Decommissioned and placed in reserve by Greek Navy
    • 1993-8-12 &mdash Stricken and sold by Greece for scrap to Dörtel Gemi Söküm Ltd. in Aliaga, Turkey
    • 1942-6-25 &mdash Laid Down, Federal Shipbuilding & Dry Dock Co., Kearny, New Jersey
    • 1942-11-11 &mdash Launched, Federal Shipbuilding & Dry Dock Co., Kearny, New Jersey
    • 1943-1-1 &mdash Commissioned
    • 1946-4-29 &mdash Decommissioned at Charleston Navy Yard, South Carolina
    • 1972-10-1 &mdash Stricken by U.S. Maritime Administration
    • 1974-1-2 &mdash Sold for scrap to Southern Scrap Materials Co., New Orleans
    • 1942-6-22 &mdash Laid Down, Federal Shipbuilding & Dry Dock Co., Kearny, New Jersey
    • 1942-12-7 &mdash Launched, Federal Shipbuilding & Dry Dock Co., Kearny, New Jersey
    • 1943-1-23 &mdash Commissioned at Brooklyn Navy Yard, New York
    • 1945-4-14 &mdash Severely damaged in kamikaze attack off Okinawa [502]
    • 1946-5-1 &mdash Placed in reserve fleet at Charleston, South Carolina
    • 1947-3-31 &mdash Decommissioned at Charleston, South Carolina
    • 1974-12-1 &mdash Stricken by U.S. Maritime Administration
    • 1975-7-31 &mdash Sold for scrap to Consolidated Steel of Brownsville, Texas
    • 1941-11-5 &mdash Laid Down, Bath Iron Works, Maine
    • 1942-8-16 &mdash Launched, Bath Iron Works, Maine
    • 1942-10-9 &mdash Commissioned
    • 1946-6-25 &mdash Decommissioned at Charleston, South Carolina
    • 1950 &mdash Reclassified as DDE-507
    • 1950-11-8 &mdash Recommissioned at Boston
    • 1962-6-30 &mdash Reclassified as DD-507
    • 1969-11-15 &mdash Decommissioned at Philadelphia and stricken by U.S. Navy
    • 1970-6-26 &mdash Towing cable parted intentionally sunk off Rhode Island as a hazard to navigation by 5-inch gunfire from destroyer Henley
    • 1941-12-24 &mdash Laid Down, Bath Iron Works, Maine
    • 1942-8-16 &mdash Launched, Bath Iron Works, Maine
    • 1942-10-30 &mdash Commissioned at Boston
    • 1946-6-18 &mdash Decommissioned at Charleston, South Carolina
    • 1949-3-26 &mdash Reclassified as DDE-508
    • 1949-11-17 &mdash Recommissioned
    • 1962-6-30 &mdash Reclassified as DD-508
    • 1969-7-2 &mdash Decommissioned at Philadelphia Naval Shipyard and stricken by U.S. Navy
    • 1970-3-20 &mdash Intentionally sunk by amphibious ship gunfire 60 miles northeast of Las Croabas, Puerto Rico
    • 1942-2-23 &mdash Laid Down, Bath Iron Works, Maine
    • 1942-8-30 &mdash Launched, Bath Iron Works, Maine
    • 1942-11-20 &mdash Commissioned
    • 1946-4-23 &mdash Decommissioned at Charleston, South Carolina
    • 1959-7-1 &mdash Loaned to Spanish Navy ( Almirante Valdés D-23) at Philadelphia
    • 1972-10-1 &mdash Stricken and sold by U.S. Navy
    • 1985-6-13 &mdash Collided off Cartagena with Spanish submarine Siroco
    • 1986-11-17 &mdash Decommissioned by Spanish Navy
    • 1988 &mdash Sold by Spanish Navy for scrap
    • 1942-3-17 &mdash Laid Down, Bath Iron Works, Maine
    • 1942-9-20 &mdash Launched, Bath Iron Works, Maine
    • 1942-12-4 &mdash Commissioned
    • 1946-6-21 &mdash Decommissioned at Charleston, South Carolina
    • 1951-1-2 &mdash Reclassified as DDE-510
    • 1951-12-11 &mdash Recommissioned at Boston Navy Yard
    • 1962-6-30 &mdash Reclassified as DD-510
    • 1969-7-2 &mdash Decommissioned and stricken by U.S. Navy
    • 1970-3-27 &mdash Intentionally sunk by gunfire 90 miles off Norfolk, Virginia
    • 1942-4-14 &mdash Laid Down, Bath Iron Works, Maine
    • 1942-10-11 &mdash Launched, Bath Iron Works, Maine
    • 1942-12-22 &mdash Commissioned at Boston Navy Yard
    • 1943-11-2 &mdash Torpedoed during Battle of Empress Augusta Bay
    • 1946-4-18 &mdash Decommissioned
    • 1972-10-1 &mdash Stricken by U.S. Maritime Administration
    • 1974-1-2 &mdash Sold for scrap to Southern Scrap Material Co., New Orleans
    • 1942-5-18 &mdash Laid Down, Bath Iron Works, Maine
    • 1942-10-27 &mdash Launched, Bath Iron Works, Maine
    • 1943-1-8 &mdash Commissioned at Boston Navy Yard
    • 1944-12-18 &mdash Lost capsized in typhoon east of Samar, Philippines
    • 1945-1-19 &mdash Stricken
    • 1942-6-8 &mdash Laid Down, Bath Iron Works, Maine
    • 1942-11-22 &mdash Launched, Bath Iron Works, Maine
    • 1943-1-26 &mdash Commissioned at Boston Navy Yard
    • 1946-8-13 &mdash Decommissioned at San Diego
    • 1974-4-1 &mdash Stricken by U.S. Maritime Administration
    • 1974-7-26 &mdash Sold to Peru for spare parts (Foreign Military Sales program)
    • 1975-1-1 &mdash Sold for scrap by Peruvian Navy
    • 1942-6-20 &mdash Laid Down, Bath Iron Works, Maine
    • 1942-12-6 &mdash Launched, Bath Iron Works, Maine
    • 1943-2-10 &mdash Commissioned
    • 1945-5-20 &mdash Struck and severely damaged by Japanese kamikaze aircraft off Okinawa
    • 1945-7-19 &mdash Struck and lightly damaged by Japanese kamikaze aircraft in Nakagusuku Bay, off Okinawa
    • 1945-11-23 &mdash Decommissioned after being declared uneconomical to repair
    • 1945-12-5 &mdash Stricken
    • 1948-1-23 &mdash Sold to Lerner Co. of Oakland, California, for scrap
    • 1942-8-17 &mdash Laid Down, Bath Iron Works, Maine
    • 1942-12-20 &mdash Launched, Bath Iron Works, Maine
    • 1943-2-26 &mdash Commissioned at Boston Navy Yard
    • 1946-4-17 &mdash Decommissioned at Charleston, South Carolina
    • 1958-1-17 &mdash Loaned to West Germany
    • 1958-1-17 &mdash Commissioned into West German Navy ( Zerstörer-1 D-170) at Charleston, South Carolina
    • 1972-3-17 &mdash Decommissioned by West German Navy at Kiel
    • 1972-4-15 &mdash Stricken by U.S. Navy and sold to West Germany for parts moored at Kiel
    • 1976 &mdash Stricken by West German Navy
    • 1978-6-9 &mdash Towed to Souda Bay, Crete, and used as Harpoon guided missile target until 1978-6-26
    • 1979-5-16 &mdash Scuttled by torpedo from West German submarine U-29 off Crete
    • 1942-8-18 &mdash Laid Down, Bath Iron Works, Maine
    • 1943-1-10 &mdash Launched, Bath Iron Works, Maine
    • 1943-3-16 &mdash Commissioned at Boston Navy Yard
    • 1946-4-18 &mdash Decommissioned at Charleston, South Carolina
    • 1959-10-6 &mdash Loaned to West Germany
    • 1959-10-6 &mdash Commissioned into West German Navy ( Zerstörer-3 D-172 ) at Charleston, South Carolina
    • 1974-10-1 &mdash Stricken by U.S. Navy and sold to West Germany
    • 1980-10-10 &mdash Arrived at Salamis Naval Base, Greece
    • 1980-10-15 &mdash Decommissioned and stricken West German Navy
    • 1980-10-15 &mdash Sold to Greece by West Germany and transferred at Salamis Naval Base, Greece
    • 1981-1-1 &mdash Commissioned into Greek Navy ( A/T Nearchos [&Alpha/&Tau &Nu&epsilon&alpha&rho&chi&omicron&sigmaf] D-65)
    • 1982-9-1 &mdash Decommissioned by Greek Navy and used for spare parts
    • 1991 &mdash Stricken by Greece and scrapped
    • 1942-8-31 &mdash Laid Down, Bath Iron Works, Maine
    • 1943-1-31 &mdash Launched, Bath Iron Works, Maine
    • 1943-4-3 &mdash Commissioned at Boston Navy Yard
    • 1946-5-31 &mdash Decommissioned at San Diego
    • 1950-9-15 &mdash Reclassified as DDE-517
    • 1950-9-15 &mdash Recommissioned at San Diego
    • 1956-7-1 &mdash Reclassified as DD-517
    • 1969-7-2 &mdash Decommissioned at San Diego, then immediately stricken and sold to Italy by U.S. Navy
    • 1969-7-2 &mdash Commissioned into Italian Navy ( Fante D-561) at San Diego
    • 1975 &mdash Decommissioned by Italian Navy
    • 1977 &mdash Stricken by Italian Navy
    • 1978 &mdash Sold for scrap by Italian Navy
    • 1942-2-15 &mdash Laid Down, Bethlehem Steel Corp., Staten Island, New York City
    • 1942-9-24 &mdash Launched, Bethlehem Steel Corp., Staten Island, New York City
    • 1943-2-3 &mdash Commissioned
    • 1943-12-26 &mdash War Loss sunk by Japanese dive bombers off Cape Gloucester, New Britain, New Guinea
    • 1942-4-29 &mdash Laid Down, Bethlehem Steel Corp., Staten Island, New York City
    • 1942-10-24 &mdash Launched, Bethlehem Steel Corp., Staten Island, New York City
    • 1943-3-10 &mdash Commissioned
    • 1946-4-18 &mdash Decommissioned at Charleston, South Carolina
    • 1951-7-6 &mdash Recommissioned
    • 1960-5-2 &mdash Decommissioned at Norfolk, Virginia
    • 1974-12-1 &mdash Stricken
    • 1976-4-22 &mdash Sold for scrap to North American Smelting Corp. of Wilmington, Delaware&dagger
    • 1942-5-12 &mdash Laid Down, Bethlehem Steel Corp., Staten Island, New York City
    • 1942-11-24 &mdash Launched, Bethlehem Steel Corp., Staten Island, New York City
    • 1943-4-12 &mdash Commissioned at New York Navy Yard
    • 1946-2-1 &mdash Decommissioned at Charleston, South Carolina
    • 1951-4-5 &mdash Recommissioned at Charleston, South Carolina
    • 1961-9-11 &mdash Decommissioned
    • 1961-10-8 &mdash Loaned to Peru
    • 1961-10-8 &mdash Commissioned into Peruvian Navy ( BAP Almirante Guise DD-72)
    • 1974-1-15 &mdash Stricken and sold by U.S. Navy
    • 1981 &mdash Decommissioned by Peruvian Navy
    • 1984? &mdash Exocet missile and torpedo target, but not sunk [unconfirmed information] BAP Ferr , then scuttled by a torpedo launched from a submarine -->
    • 1981 &mdash Sold for scrap by Peru
    • 1942-7-27 &mdash Laid Down, Bethlehem Steel Corp., Staten Island, New York City
    • 1943-2-3 &mdash Launched, Bethlehem Steel Corp., Staten Island, New York City
    • 1943-5-22 &mdash Commissioned
    • 1947-2-5 &mdash Decommissioned at Charleston, South Carolina
    • 1951-2-8 &mdash Recommissioned
    • 1954-1-15 &mdash Decommissioned Charleston, South Carolina
    • 1967-6-1 &mdash Loaned to Taiwan
    • 1967-6-1 &mdash Commissioned into Taiwanese Navy ( ROCS An Yang DD-18/DD-997/DDG-918) at Boston Navy Yard
    • 1974-1-25 &mdash Stricken and sold by U.S. Navy
    • 1999-9-16 &mdash Decommissioned by Taiwanese Navy
    • 2003-10-14 &mdash Sunk as target by Taiwanese Navy SUT (Surface and Underwater Torpedo) fired from submarine during Lien Hsing 90 exercise off Chia Lu Tang beach, Pingtung County, in southern Taiwan [521]
    • 1942-8-24 &mdash Laid Down, Bethlehem Steel Corp., Staten Island, New York City
    • 1943-3-6 &mdash Launched, Bethlehem Steel Corp., Staten Island, New York City
    • 1943-6-21 &mdash Commissioned
    • 1945-5-4 &mdash War Loss sunk by two Japanese kamikaze aircraft off Kerama Retto, near Okinawa
    • 1940-7-19 &mdash Authorized
    • 1941-10-30 &mdash Laid Down, Bethlehem Steel Corp., San Francisco
    • 1942-8-18 &mdash Launched, Bethlehem Steel Corp., San Francisco
    • 1943-2-5 &mdash Commissioned
    • 1944-11-1 &mdash War Loss sunk by Japanese kamikaze aircraft off Samar, Philippines
    • 1941-11-29 &mdash Laid Down, Bethlehem Steel Corp., San Francisco
    • 1942-9-17 &mdash Launched, Bethlehem Steel Corp., San Francisco
    • 1943-3-12 &mdash Commissioned at Bethlehem Steel shipyard, San Francisco
    • 1946-4-15 &mdash Decommissioned at Charleston, South Carolina
    • 1951-4-5 &mdash Recommissioned at Charleston, South Carolina
    • 1960-7-19 &mdash Rammed broadside by Sumner-class destroyer Collett in fog 8 miles off Newport Beach, California damaged beyond repair [527]
    • 1960-9-15 &mdash Decommissioned at San Diego
    • 1960-10-1 &mdash Stricken
    • 1961-4-20 &mdash Sold for scrap to National Metal & Steel, Los Angeles
    • 1942-1-16 &mdash Laid Down, Bethlehem Steel Corp., San Francisco
    • 1942-10-10 &mdash Launched, Bethlehem Steel Corp., San Francisco
    • 1943-4-23 &mdash Commissioned
    • 1946-2-13 &mdash Decommissioned at Charleston, South Carolina
    • 1951-3-8 &mdash Recommissioned at Charleston, South Carolina
    • 1971-10-6 &mdash Decommissioned at Los Angeles-Long Beach Naval Base Stricken and sold by U.S. Navy
    • 1971-10-6 &mdash Commissioned into Taiwanese Navy ( ROCS Chiang Yang DD-9/DD-947/DDG-909) at Los Angeles-Long Beach Naval Base
    • 1999-7-16 &mdash Decommissioned at Kaohsiung, Taiwan, and stricken by Taiwanese Navy
    • 2001-11-2 &mdash Sunk off Gongliao Township, Taipei County, northeast Taiwan, as artificial reef [528]
    • 1942-2-12 &mdash Laid Down, Bethlehem Steel Co., San Francisco
    • 1942-10-27 &mdash Launched, Bethlehem Steel Co., San Francisco
    • 1943-5-10 &mdash Commissioned at Bethlehem Steel Co., San Francisco
    • 1945-4-6 &mdash War Loss sunk by Japanese kamikaze aircraft off Okinawa
    • 1942-3-17 &mdash Laid Down, Bethlehem Steel Corp., San Francisco
    • 1942-10-22 &mdash Launched, Bethlehem Steel Corp., San Francisco
    • 1943-5-28 &mdash Commissioned
    • 1946-1-18 &mdash Decommissioned at San Diego
    • 1951-8-1 &mdash Recommissioned
    • 1965-3-15 &mdash Towed to San Diego from Todd Shipyard, Los Angeles
    • 1965-5-11 &mdash Decommissioned at San Diego
    • 1972-6 &mdash Declared uneconomical to update
    • 1972-11-1 &mdash Stricken and authorized for use as target in Harpoon tests
    • 1973-11 &mdash Sold for scrap after being used as a target off Southern California
    • 1942-4-11 &mdash Laid Down, Bethlehem Steel Corp., San Francisco
    • 1942-10-20 &mdash Launched, Bethlehem Steel Corp., San Francisco
    • 1943-6-18 &mdash Commissioned
    • 1946-1-18 &mdash Decommissioned at San Diego
    • 1951-9-12 &mdash Recommissioned at San Diego
    • 1965-3-19 &mdash Decommissioned and stored at Philadelphia
    • 1974-12-1 &mdash Stricken
    • 1976-4-14 &mdash Sold for scrap to Union Minerals & Iron Co. of New York City&dagger
    • 1942-5-8 &mdash Laid Down, Bethlehem Steel Corp., San Francisco
    • 1942-12-5 &mdash Launched, Bethlehem Steel Corp., San Francisco
    • 1943-7-6 &mdash Commissioned
    • 1946-6-12 &mdash Decommissioned at San Diego
    • 1951-9-12 &mdash Recommissioned at San Diego
    • 1957-12-20 &mdash Decommissioned at Boston stored at South Boston Naval Annex
    • 1961-8-14 &mdash Loaned to Argentina
    • 1961-8-14 &mdash Commissioned into Argentine Navy ( ARA Almirante Brown D20)
    • 1975-9-1 &mdash Stricken by U.S. Navy and sold to Argentina
    • 1976-3-15 &mdash Decommissioned by Argentine Navy and assigned to Directorate of Naval Material
    • 1979-12-18 &mdash Sold for scrap to Establecimientos Metalúrgicos Santa Rosa, Argentina
    • 1982 &mdash Scrapped
    • 1942-6-4 &mdash Laid Down, Bethlehem Steel Corp., San Francisco
    • 1942-12-19 &mdash Launched, Bethlehem Steel Corp., San Francisco
    • 1943-7-29 &mdash Commissioned
    • 1944-10-25 &mdash War Loss sunk by Japanese warships off Samar, Philippines
    • 1942-3-17 &mdash Laid Down, Bethlehem Steel Corp., San Francisco
    • 1943-1-10 &mdash Launched, Bethlehem Steel Corp., San Francisco
    • 1943-8-19 &mdash Commissioned
    • 1947-1-15 &mdash Decommissioned at San Diego
    • 1951-8-1 &mdash Recommissioned at San Diego
    • 1954-6-9 &mdash Decommissioned at Norfolk, Virginia
    • 1972-10-1 &mdash Stricken
    • 1974-1-2 &mdash Sold for scrap to Southern Scrap Material Co. of New Orleans
    • 1942-8-18 &mdash Laid Down, Bethlehem Steel Corp., San Francisco
    • 1943-3-7 &mdash Launched, Bethlehem Steel Corp., San Francisco
    • 1943-8-31 &mdash Commissioned
    • 1945-12-19 &mdash Decommissioned at San Diego
    • 1951-5-19 &mdash Recommissioned at San Diego
    • 1964-6-30 &mdash Decommissioned at Norfolk, Virginia later stored at Philadelphia
    • 1971-8-5 &mdash Renamed James Miller &dagger [535]
    • 1974-12-1 &mdash Stricken
    • 1975-7-31 &mdash Sold for scrap to Union Metals & Iron Company of New York City
    • 1942-9-17 &mdash Laid Down, Bethlehem Steel Corp., San Francisco
    • 1943-3-21 &mdash Launched, Bethlehem Steel Corp., San Francisco
    • 1943-9-20 &mdash Commissioned
    • 1946-12-10 &mdash Decommissioned at San Diego
    • 1951-8-17 &mdash Recommissioned at San Diego
    • 1958-5-27 &mdash Decommissioned at Mare Island Naval Shipyard, Vallejo, California
    • 1973-4-15 &mdash Stricken
    • 1973-11-27 &mdash Sold for scrap to to Zidell Explorations Inc. of Portland, Oregon&dagger
    • 1942-10-10 &mdash Laid Down, Bethlehem Steel Corp., San Francisco
    • 1943-4-4 &mdash Launched, Bethlehem Steel Corp., San Francisco
    • 1943-9-30 &mdash Commissioned at San Francisco
    • 1946-1-10 &mdash Decommissioned at San Diego
    • 1951-7-6 &mdash Recommissioned at Los Angeles
    • 1965-1-7 &mdash Decommissioned at Philadelphia
    • 1974-12-1 &mdash Stricken
    • 1977-6-21 &mdash Donated as Museum, Buffalo and Erie County Naval & Military Park, New York
    • 1942-10-27 &mdash Laid Down, Bethlehem Steel Corp., San Francisco
    • 1943-4-28 &mdash Launched, Bethlehem Steel Corp., San Francisco
    • 1943-10-21 &mdash Commissioned in San Francisco
    • 1945-9-21 &mdash Decommissioned at San Diego
    • 1951-3-29 &mdash Recommissioned at San Diego
    • 1958-4-21 &mdash Decommissioned at San Francisco Naval Shipyard
    • 1972-12-1 &mdash Stricken
    • 1973-11-27 &mdash Sold for scrap to Zidell Explorations Inc. of Portland, Oregon&dagger
    • 1942-10-22 &mdash Laid Down, Bethlehem Steel Corp., San Francisco
    • 1943-5-28 &mdash Launched, Bethlehem Steel Corp., San Francisco
    • 1943-11-25 &mdash Commissioned
    • 1946-3-1 &mdash Decommissioned
    • 1951-1-27 &mdash Recommissioned
    • 1963-8-1 &mdash Struck broadside amidships by destroyer escort Vammen 200 miles off Southern California, en route to Hawaii returned to drydock in San Diego but determined to be damaged beyond economical repair
    • 1963-11-30 &mdash Decommissioned at San Diego
    • 1965-11-1 &mdash Stricken
    • 1966-5-1 &mdash Sunk by gunfire from Bannock-class fleet tug Tawasa off San Clemente Island, California&dagger [539]
    • 1942-11-20 &mdash Laid Down, Bethlehem Steel Corp., San Francisco
    • 1943-7-11 &mdash Launched, Bethlehem Steel Corp., San Francisco
    • 1943-12-1 &mdash Commissioned at San Francisco
    • 1946-6-14 &mdash Decommissioned at San Diego
    • 1950-6-10 &mdash Recommissioned
    • 1971-7-1 &mdash Decommissioned and stricken by U.S. Navy
    • 1971-7-1 &mdash Transferred to Taiwan
    • 1971-8-16 &mdash Sold to Taiwan
    • 1971-11-21 &mdash Commissioned into Taiwanese Navy ( ROCS Kwei Yang DD-8/DD-956/DDG-908)
    • 1999-7-16 &mdash Decommissioned at Kaohsiung, Taiwan, by Taiwanese Navy stored for parts in Kaohsiung Harbor Naval Shipyard
    • 2003-9-4 &mdash Intentionally torpedoed by Taiwanese submarine Hai Lung during Han Kuang 19 exercises off Yilan County in northeastern Taiwan [540]
    • 1942-12-6 &mdash Laid Down, Bethlehem Steel Corp., San Francisco
    • 1943-7-25 &mdash Launched, Bethlehem Steel Corp., San Francisco
    • 1943-12-30 &mdash Commissioned
    • 1947-1-15 &mdash Decommissioned at San Diego
    • 1950-8-31 &mdash Recommissioned at San Diego
    • 1958-9-30 &mdash Decommissioned
    • 1968-6-10 &mdash Loaned to Taiwan at Hawaii towed to Taiwan
    • 1968-10-7 &mdash Commissioned into Taiwanese Navy (as minelayer ROCS Kun Yang DD-19/DD-934/DDG-919)
    • 1974-1-25 &mdash Stricken by U.S. Navy and sold to Taiwan
    • 1999-10-16 &mdash Decommissioned by Taiwanese Navy at Hsinpin Wharf, Kaohsiung Harbor, Taiwan presumed scrapped or used as target
    • 1942-4-2 &mdash Laid Down, Bethlehem Steel Corp., San Pedro, Los Angeles
    • 1942-10-29 &mdash Launched, Bethlehem Steel Corp., San Pedro, Los Angeles
    • 1943-5-8 &mdash Commissioned at Bethlehem Steel Corp., San Pedro, Los Angeles
    • 1947-1-15 &mdash Decommissioned at San Diego
    • 1950-11-24 &mdash Recommissioned
    • 1969-10-1 &mdash Decommissioned and stricken by U.S. Navy, then sold to Turkey
    • 1969-10-1 &mdash Delivered to Turkish Navy
    • 1970-10-6 &mdash Commissioned into Turkish Navy ( TCG İskenderun D-343) at Gölcük Naval Base, Turkey
    • 1982-1-20 &mdash Decommissioned by Turkish Navy
    • 1982 &mdash Sold for scrap by Turkey possibly used for spare parts
    • 1942-4-28 &mdash Laid Down, Bethlehem Steel Corp., San Pedro, Los Angeles
    • 1942-12-12 &mdash Launched, Bethlehem Steel Corp., San Pedro, Los Angeles
    • 1943-6-12 &mdash Commissioned
    • 1946-7-11 &mdash Decommissioned at San Diego
    • 1950-10-27 &mdash Recommissioned
    • 1961-9-28 &mdash Decommissioned at Bremerton, Washington
    • 1962-9-27 &mdash Loaned to Greece
    • 1962-9-27 &mdash Commissioned into Greek Navy ( A/T Thyella [&Alpha/&Tau &Theta&upsilon&epsilon&lambda&lambda&alpha] D-28) at Seattle
    • 1975-9-1 &mdash Stricken by U.S. Navy and sold to Greece
    • 1981-1-1 &mdash Decommissioned by Greek Navy and sold for scrap
    • 1942-6-27 &mdash Laid Down, Bethlehem Steel Corp., San Pedro, Los Angeles
    • 1943-2-21 &mdash Launched, Bethlehem Steel Corp., San Pedro, Los Angeles
    • 1943-7-10 &mdash Commissioned at San Pedro, Los Angeles
    • 1946-8-1 &mdash Decommissioned at San Diego
    • 1950-10-27 &mdash Recommissioned
    • 1962-2-9 &mdash Decommissioned
    • 1962-9-27 &mdash Loaned to Greece
    • 1962-9-27 &mdash Commissioned into Greek Navy ( A/T Navarino [&Alpha/&Tau &Nu&alpha&upsilon&alpha&rho&iota&nu&omicron&nu] D-63) at Seattle
    • 1975-9-1 &mdash Stricken by U.S. Navy and sold to Greece
    • 1981-10-31 &mdash Decommissioned by Greek Navy and sold for scrap
    • 1942-9-7 &mdash Laid Down, Bethlehem Steel Corp., San Pedro, Los Angeles
    • 1943-3-18 &mdash Launched, Bethlehem Steel Corp., San Pedro, Los Angeles
    • 1943-8-23 &mdash Commissioned
    • 1946-7-22 &mdash Decommissioned at San Diego
    • 1951-9-21 &mdash Recommissioned at San Diego
    • 1971-8-17 &mdash Decommissioned at Treasure Island, San Francisco stricken by U.S. Navy and donated to Argentina
    • 1971-8-17 &mdash Commissioned into Argentine Navy ( ARA Almirante Storni D-24) at Treasure Island, San Francisco
    • 1979-12-30 &mdash Decommissioned by Argentine Navy at Puerto Belgrano Naval Base
    • 1981-12-29 &mdash Sold for scrap to Padovani Shipyards, Campana, Argentina
    • 1941-6-12 &mdash Laid Down, Gulf Shipbuilding Corp., Chickasaw, Alabama
    • 1942-5-31 &mdash Launched, Gulf Shipbuilding Corp., Chickasaw, Alabama
    • 1943-6-23 &mdash Commissioned
    • 1947-1-15 &mdash Decommissioned at Long Beach, California
    • 1957-5-15 &mdash Loaned to Spain
    • 1957-5-15 &mdash Commissioned into Spanish Navy ( Lepanto D-21)
    • 1972-10-1 &mdash Stricken and sold by U.S. Navy
    • 1983-12-12 &mdash Major shipboard fire while anchored at Ferrol, Spain
    • 1985-12-31 &mdash Decommissioned and sold for scrap by Spanish Navy
    • 1941-6-12 &mdash Laid Down, Gulf Shipbuilding Corp., Chickasaw, Alabama
    • 1943-7-4 &mdash Launched, Gulf Shipbuilding Corp., Chickasaw, Alabama
    • 1943-9-18 &mdash Commissioned
    • 1946-8-17 &mdash Decommissioned at San Diego
    • 1957-5-15 &mdash Loaned to Spain
    • 1957-5-23 &mdash Commissioned into Spanish Navy ( Almirante Ferrándiz 41/D-22) at San Francisco
    • 1972-10-1 &mdash Stricken by U.S. Navy and sold to Spain
    • 1987-11-17 &mdash Decommissioned by Spanish Navy at Ferrol, Spain, and sold for scrap
    • 1941-7-21 &mdash Laid Down, Gulf Shipbuilding Corp., Chickasaw, Alabama
    • 1942-10-4 &mdash Launched, Gulf Shipbuilding Corp., Chickasaw, Alabama
    • 1943-12-11 &mdash Commissioned at Mobile, Alabama
    • 1945-5-11 &mdash Damaged beyond repair by Japanese kamikaze aircraft off Okinawa
    • 1945-8-17 &mdash Repair work at Mare Island Naval Shipyard, Vallejo, California, halted
    • 1945-9-10 &mdash Declared uneconomical to repair
    • 1945-11-7 &mdash Decommissioned at Mare Island Naval Shipyard, Vallejo, California
    • 1945-11-28 &mdash Stricken
    • 1947-2-11 &mdash Sold for scrap to J.C. Beckwit & Co., San Francisco&dagger
    • 1941-7-21 &mdash Laid Down, Gulf Shipbuilding Corp., Chickasaw, Alabama
    • 1942-11-15 &mdash Launched, Gulf Shipbuilding Corp., Chickasaw, Alabama
    • 1944-2-2 &mdash Commissioned
    • 1946-4-30 &mdash Decommissioned at San Diego, then moved to Bremerton, Washington
    • 1968-5-1 &mdash Stricken
    • 1970-5-1 &mdash Sold for scrap to Zidell Explorations Inc. of Portland, Oregon
    • 1942-3-8 &mdash Laid Down, Seattle-Tacoma Shipbuilding Corp., Seattle
    • 1942-12-7 &mdash Launched, Seattle-Tacoma Shipbuilding Corp., Seattle
    • 1943-7-30 &mdash Commissioned
    • 1946-5-31 &mdash Decommissioned at San Pedro, Los Angeles
    • 1972-12-1 &mdash Stricken
    • 1973-08-1 &mdash Sold for scrap to Zidell Explorations Inc. of Portland, Oregon&dagger
    • 1942-3-27 &mdash Laid Down, Seattle-Tacoma Shipbuilding Corp., Seattle
    • 1943-2-9 &mdash Launched, Seattle-Tacoma Shipbuilding Corp., Seattle
    • 1943-8-31 &mdash Commissioned
    • 1945-4-29 &mdash Damaged beyond repair by Japanese kamikaze aircraft off Okinawa
    • 1945-11-1 &mdash Decommissioned at Norfolk, Virginia
    • 1945-11-16 &mdash Stricken
    • 1946-3-3 &mdash Scrapped at Norfolk Navy Yard
    • 1942-4-11 &mdash Laid Down, Seattle-Tacoma Shipbuilding Corp., Seattle
    • 1943-3-9 &mdash Launched, Seattle-Tacoma Shipbuilding Corp., Seattle
    • 1943-9-30 &mdash Commissioned
    • 1946-1-27 &mdash Decommissioned at San Diego
    • 1951-4-27 &mdash Recommissioned at San Diego
    • 1960-11-3 &mdash Decommissioned at Portsmouth, Virginia
    • 1961-7-20 &mdash Loaned to Brazil
    • 1961-7-20 &mdash Commissioned into Brazilian Navy ( CT Pernambuco D-30) at Norfolk Navy Yard, Virginia
    • 1973-8-1 &mdash Stricken and sold by U.S. Navy
    • 1982-4-4 &mdash Decommissioned by Brazilian Navy
    • 1982 &mdash Sold by Brazil and scrapped
    • 1987-2-11 &mdash Surviving 5-inch (127mm) gun and mount dedicated as monument at Rio de Janeiro naval base
    • 1942-5-6 &mdash Laid Down, Seattle-Tacoma Shipbuilding Corp., Seattle
    • 1943-3-25 &mdash Launched, Seattle-Tacoma Shipbuilding Corp., Seattle
    • 1943-10-27 &mdash Commissioned
    • 1944-10-25 &mdash War Loss sunk by Japanese warships off Samar, Philippines
    • 1942-5-19 &mdash Laid Down, Seattle-Tacoma Shipbuilding Corp., Seattle
    • 1943-4-22 &mdash Launched, Seattle-Tacoma Shipbuilding Corp., Seattle
    • 1943-11-18 &mdash Commissioned
    • 1946-12-10 &mdash Decommissioned at San Diego
    • 1951-11-2 &mdash Recommissioned at Long Beach Naval Shipyard, California
    • 1964-3-30 &mdash Decommissioned at Mare Island Naval Shipyard, Vallejo, California
    • 1973-4-15 &mdash Stricken
    • 1973-12-3 &mdash Sold for scrap to American Ship Dismantlers of Portland, Oregon
    • 1973-12-28 &mdash Transferred to American Ship Dismantlers for scrapping
    • 1942-6-16 &mdash Laid Down, Seattle-Tacoma Shipbuilding Corp., Seattle
    • 1943-6-4 &mdash Launched, Seattle-Tacoma Shipbuilding Corp., Seattle
    • 1943-12-4 &mdash Commissioned
    • 1945-5-14 &mdash Grounded off Okinawa
    • 1945-5-18 &mdash War Loss destroyed by Japanese shore batteries while aground off Okinawa
    • 1942-6-30 &mdash Laid Down, Seattle-Tacoma Shipbuilding Corp., Seattle
    • 1943-7-4 &mdash Launched, Seattle-Tacoma Shipbuilding Corp., Seattle
    • 1943-12-18 &mdash Commissioned
    • 1945-5-4 &mdash War Loss sunk by four Japanese kamikaze aircraft off Okinawa
    • 1957-7 &mdash Wreckage donated to government of the Ryukyu Islands
    • 1942-7-20 &mdash Laid Down, Seattle-Tacoma Shipbuilding Corp., Seattle
    • 1943-7-31 &mdash Launched, Seattle-Tacoma Shipbuilding Corp., Seattle
    • 1944-1-15 &mdash Commissioned
    • 1946-3-14 &mdash Decommissioned at San Diego
    • 1951-8-17 &mdash Recommissioned
    • 1970-1-10 &mdash Decommissioned at San Diego and stricken by U.S. Navy, then sold to Italy
    • 1970-1-17 &mdash Commissioned into Italian Navy ( Geniere D-555)
    • 1975 &mdash Decommissioned and stricken by Italian Navy and sold for scrap
    • 1942-8-12 &mdash Laid Down, Seattle-Tacoma Shipbuilding Corp., Seattle
    • 1943-8-28 &mdash Launched, Seattle-Tacoma Shipbuilding Corp., Seattle
    • 1944-1-31 &mdash Commissioned at Seattle
    • 1946-6-12 &mdash Decommissioned at Charleston, South Carolina
    • 1951-8-3 &mdash Recommissioned at Charleston, South Carolina
    • 1964-6-5 &mdash Decommissioned at Norfolk, Virginia
    • 1974-12-1 &mdash Stricken
    • 1982-4-13 &mdash Intentionally sunk by Los Angeles-class submarine Cincinnati 310 nautical miles northeast of San Juan, Puerto Rico&dagger
    • 1942-9-7 &mdash Laid Down, Seattle-Tacoma Shipbuilding Corp., Seattle
    • 1943-9-18 &mdash Launched, Seattle-Tacoma Shipbuilding Corp., Seattle
    • 1944-2-21 &mdash Commissioned
    • 1946-6-4 &mdash Decommissioned at San Diego
    • 1951-10-27 &mdash Recommissioned
    • 1959-11-6 &mdash Decommissioned at Beaumont, Texas, and moved to Norfolk, Virginia
    • 1974-12-1 &mdash Stricken
    • 1978-1-26 &mdash Intentionally sunk off Puerto Rico
    • 1942-12-7 &mdash Laid Down, Seattle-Tacoma Shipbuilding Corp., Seattle
    • 1943-9-30 &mdash Launched, Seattle-Tacoma Shipbuilding Corp., Seattle
    • 1944-3-13 &mdash Commissioned
    • 1947-1-31 &mdash Decommissioned at Charleston, South Carolina
    • 1951-10-5 &mdash Recommissioned at Charleston, South Carolina
    • 1959-11-6 &mdash Decommissioned at Norfolk, Virginia
    • 1974-12-1 &mdash Stricken
    • 1978-2-23 &mdash Intentionally sunk off Puerto Rico
    • 1943-2-9 &mdash Laid Down, Seattle-Tacoma Shipbuilding Corp., Seattle
    • 1943-10-27 &mdash Launched, Seattle-Tacoma Shipbuilding Corp., Seattle
    • 1944-3-31 &mdash Commissioned at Seattle-Tacoma Shipbuilding Corp., Seattle, Washington
    • 1946-7-9 &mdash Decommissioned at Charleston, South Carolina
    • 1951-7-3 &mdash Recommissioned at Charleston, South Carolina
    • 1957-9-30 &mdash Decommissioned at Philadelphia [565]
    • 1965-4-1 &mdash Stricken
    • 1966-1-4 &mdash Sold for scrap to Portsmouth Salvage Co. of Virginia&dagger
    • 1943-3-10 &mdash Laid Down, Seattle-Tacoma Shipbuilding Corp., Seattle
    • 1943-11-19 &mdash Launched, Seattle-Tacoma Shipbuilding Corp., Seattle
    • 1944-4-15 &mdash Commissioned at Seattle-Tacoma Shipbuilding Corp., Seattle
    • 1946-7-8 &mdash Decommissioned at Charleston, South Carolina
    • 1951-3-9 &mdash Recommissioned at Charleston, South Carolina
    • 1969-9-26 &mdash Decommissioned at Mare Island Naval Shipyard, Vallejo, California
    • 1975-6-1 &mdash Stricken [566]
    • 1976-6-30 &mdash Started service as target and test vessel at Pacific Missile Test Center, Point Mugu, California
    • 1997-7-22 &mdash Towed 73 miles north-northwest of Kauai, Hawaii, and sunk with charges placed by a SEAL team
    • 1943-3-26 &mdash Laid Down, Seattle-Tacoma Shipbuilding Corp., Seattle
    • 1943-12-31 &mdash Launched, Seattle-Tacoma Shipbuilding Corp., Seattle
    • 1944-4-29 &mdash Commissioned
    • 1946-4-12 &mdash Decommissioned at Charleston Naval Shipyard, South Carolina
    • 1951-7-6 &mdash Recommissioned
    • 1964-12-1 &mdash Decommissioned at Bremerton, Washington
    • 1974-2-1 &mdash Stricken
    • 1974-9-5 &mdash Sold to General Metals Co. of Tacoma, Washington, for scrap
    • 1943-4-24 &mdash Laid Down, Seattle-Tacoma Shipbuilding Corp., Seattle
    • 1944-1-29 &mdash Launched, Seattle-Tacoma Shipbuilding Corp., Seattle
    • 1944-5-20 &mdash Commissioned
    • 1946-7-13 &mdash Decommissioned at Charleston, South Carolina
    • 1951-9-7 &mdash Recommissioned at Charleston, South Carolina
    • 1963-10-1 &mdash Decommissioned
    • 1974-12-1 &mdash Stricken
    • 1975-10-22 &mdash Sold to North American Smelting Co. of Wilmington, Delaware, for scrap
    • 1941-5-14 &mdash Laid Down, Consolidated Steel Corp., Orange, Texas
    • 1942-3-2 &mdash Launched, Consolidated Steel Corp., Orange, Texas
    • 1942-10-27 &mdash Commissioned
    • 1946-4-18 &mdash Decommissioned
    • 1959-8-21 &mdash Loaned to Greece
    • 1959-8-21 &mdash Commissioned into Greek Navy ( A/T Sfendoni [&Alpha/&Tau &Sigma&phi&epsilon&nu&delta&omicron&nu&eta] D-85) at Philadelphia
    • 1975-9-1 &mdash Stricken by U.S. Navy and sold to Greece
    • 1992-10-25 &mdash Decommissioned and stricken by Greek Navy stored at Souda Bay, Crete
    • 1997 &mdash Scrapped at Aliaga, Turkey
    • 1941-5-14 &mdash Laid Down, Consolidated Steel Corp., Orange, Texas
    • 1942-3-16 &mdash Launched, Consolidated Steel Corp., Orange, Texas
    • 1942-11-24 &mdash Commissioned
    • 1946-4-18 &mdash Decommissioned at Charleston, South Carolina
    • 1960-4-12 &mdash Loaned to West Germany
    • 1960-4-12 &mdash Commissioned into West German Navy ( Zerstörer-6 D-180)
    • 1967 &mdash Rammed stern of West German frigate Karlsruhe at Bremerhaven moderate bow damage
    • 1967-12-1 &mdash Stricken by U.S. Navy and sold to West Germany
    • 1967-12-15 &mdash Decommissioned by West German Navy at Kiel
    • 1968-10-9 &mdash Sold by VEBEG (Federal Disposal Sales and Marketing Agency) to Fa. Harmsdorf, Lübeck, West Germany
    • 1969 &mdash Towed to Lübeck, West Germany
    • 1981-10 &mdash Towed to Neustadt-in-Holstein, West Germany, and used for damage control training then towed to Howaldtswerke-Deutsche Werft Kiel and scrapped
    • 1941-6-25 &mdash Laid Down, Consolidated Steel Corp., Orange, Texas
    • 1942-4-1 &mdash Launched, Consolidated Steel Corp., Orange, Texas
    • 1942-12-8 &mdash Commissioned
    • 1946-4-18 &mdash Decommissioned at Charleston, South Carolina
    • 1959-12-15 &mdash Loaned West Germany
    • 1959-12-15 &mdash Commissioned into West German Navy ( Zerstörer-4 D-178) at Charleston, South Carolina
    • 1974-10-1 &mdash Stricken by U.S. Navy and sold to West Germany
    • 1980-10-10 &mdash Arrived at Salamis Naval Base, Greece
    • 1981-2-26 &mdash Decommissioned by West German Navy at Salamis Naval Base, Greece
    • 1981-2-26 &mdash Sold to Greece for spare parts by West Germany stored at Crete
    • 1992-6 &mdash Scrapped at Elevsis, Greece
    • 1941-6-25 &mdash Laid Down, Consolidated Steel Corp., Orange, Texas
    • 1942-4-15 &mdash Launched, Consolidated Steel Corp., Orange, Texas
    • 1942-12-30 &mdash Commissioned
    • 1947-3-31 &mdash Decommissioned at Charleston, South Carolina
    • 1960-2-17 &mdash Loaned to West Germany
    • 1960-2-23 &mdash Commissioned into West German Navy ( Zerstörer-5 D-179) at Charleston, South Carolina
    • 1974-10-1 &mdash Stricken by U.S. Navy
    • 1982-2-26 &mdash Sold (Foreign Military Sales program) by U.S. Navy to West German Navy
    • 1982-2-26 &mdash Decommissioned and stricken by West German Navy at Souda Bay, Crete
    • 1982-2-26 &mdash Sold to Greece for spare parts by West Germany
    • 1992-6 &mdash Scrapped at Elevsis, Greece
    • 1941-6-25 &mdash Laid Down, Consolidated Steel Corp., Orange, Texas
    • 1942-5-4 &mdash Launched, Consolidated Steel Corp., Orange, Texas
    • 1943-1-25 &mdash Commissioned
    • 1946-4-1 &mdash Decommissioned at Charleston, South Carolina
    • 1965 &mdash Moved to Philadelphia
    • 1968 &mdash Moved to Orange, Texas
    • 1968-5-1 &mdash Loaned to Mexico
    • 1968-5-1 &mdash Commissioned into Mexican Navy ( ARM Cuauhtémoc E-01)
    • 1970-8-19 &mdash Stricken by U.S. Navy and sold to Mexico
    • 1982 &mdash Decommissioned by Mexican Navy and dismantled
    • 1941-6-25 &mdash Laid Down, Consolidated Steel Corp., Orange, Texas
    • 1942-5-7 &mdash Launched, Consolidated Steel Corp., Orange, Texas
    • 1943-2-9 &mdash Commissioned
    • 1947-5-25 &mdash Decommissioned at Charleston, South Carolina
    • 1968-5-1 &mdash Loaned to Mexico
    • 1968-5-1 &mdash Commissioned into Mexican Navy ( ARM Cuitláhuac E-02/E-01)
    • 1970-8-19 &mdash Stricken by U.S. Navy and sold to Mexico
    • 2001-7-19 &mdash Decommissioned from Mexican Navy last Fletcher worldwide to be decommissioned from active service
    • 2005-12-7 &mdash Donation agreement with Beauchamp Tower Corporation of Milton, Florida, for restoration as a museum
    • 2006-11-30 &mdash President of Mexico formalized donation to Beauchamp Tower Corporation
    • 2006-12-30 &mdash Towed to civilian wharf in Ciudad Lázaro Cárdenas, Michoacán, Mexico, from nearby Tenth Naval District base
    • 2010-7-15 &mdash Declared abandoned condemned as a hazard to navigation by the captain of the port of Lázaro Cárdenas and ordered to be scrapped [574]
    • 2010-9-6 &mdash Scrapped at Reciclajes Ecologicos Maritimos, S.A de C.V. (ECOMAR), Lázaro Cárdenas
    • 2011-4 &mdash Scrapping completed
    • 1942-3-2 &mdash Laid Down, Consolidated Steel Corp., Orange, Texas
    • 1942-8-2 &mdash Launched, Consolidated Steel Corp., Orange, Texas
    • 1943-3-31 &mdash Commissioned
    • 1946-2-25 &mdash Decommissioned at Charleston, South Carolina
    • 1970-10-1 &mdash Stricken and moved to Inactive Ship Maintenance Facility, Orange, Texas
    • 1974-1-2 &mdash Sold for scrap to Southern Scrap Material Co. of New Orleans&dagger
    • 1942-3-16 &mdash Laid Down, Consolidated Steel Corp., Orange, Texas
    • 1942-8-16 &mdash Launched, Consolidated Steel Corp., Orange, Texas
    • 1943-4-20 &mdash Commissioned
    • 1946-3-27 &mdash Decommissioned
    • 1951-1-2 &mdash Reclassified DDE-576
    • 1951-10-16 &mdash Recommissioned at Charleston, South Carolina
    • 1962-6-20 &mdash Reclassified DD-576
    • 1965-5-1 &mdash Decommissioned at Norfolk, Virginia
    • 1966-6-1 &mdash Stricken
    • 1966-8-16 &mdash Sold for scrap to Boston Metals Co. of Baltimore
    • 1942-4-1 &mdash Laid Down, Consolidated Steel Corp., Orange, Texas
    • 1942-8-31 &mdash Launched, Consolidated Steel Corp., Orange, Texas
    • 1943-5-19 &mdash Commissioned
    • 1946-1-18 &mdash Decommissioned at San Diego
    • 1950-9-15 &mdash Recommissioned at San Diego as DDE-577
    • 1962 &mdash Reclassified as DD-577
    • 1968-9-30 &mdash Decommissioned
    • 1968-10-10 &mdash Stricken
    • 1971-12-15 &mdash Sold for scrap to Chou&rsquos Iron & Steel Co. of Kaoshiung, Taiwan
    • 1942-4-15 &mdash Laid Down, Consolidated Steel Corp., Orange, Texas
    • 1942-9-13 &mdash Launched, Consolidated Steel Corp., Orange, Texas
    • 1943-6-16 &mdash Commissioned
    • 1945-12-20 &mdash Decommissioned
    • 1972-11-1 &mdash Stricken and authorized for use as target in Harpoon tests
    • 1974-4-8 &mdash Intentionally sunk as target off California
    • 1942-5-7 &mdash Laid Down, Consolidated Steel Corp., Orange, Texas
    • 1942-9-27 &mdash Launched, Consolidated Steel Corp., Orange, Texas
    • 1943-7-6 &mdash Commissioned
    • 1945-6-10 &mdash War Loss sunk by Japanese Aichi D3A &ldquoVal&rdquo kamikaze dive bomber off Okinawa
    • 1945-7-11 &mdash Stricken
    • 1942-5-7 &mdash Laid Down, Consolidated Steel Corp., Orange, Texas
    • 1942-10-15 &mdash Launched, Consolidated Steel Corp., Orange, Texas
    • 1943-7-31 &mdash Commissioned
    • 1946-3-31 &mdash Decommissioned at Charleston, South Carolina
    • 1968-5-1 &mdash Stricken
    • 1970-3-6 &mdash Intentionally sunk by naval gunfire 114 miles west-northwest of Virginia Beach&dagger
    • 1942-2-20 &mdash Laid Down, Boston Navy Yard
    • 1942-6-3 &mdash Launched, Boston Navy Yard
    • 1943-5-18 &mdash Commissioned
    • 1947-1-15 &mdash Decommissioned at San Diego
    • 1959-6-16 &mdash Loaned to Greece
    • 1959-7-15 &mdash Commissioned into Greek Navy ( A/T Velos [&Alpha/&Tau &Beta&epsilon&lambda&omicron&sigmaf] D-16) at Long Beach, California
    • 1973-5-23 &mdash Mutiny at Fiumicino, Italy
    • 1973-6 (circa) &mdash Returned to Greece under new crew
    • 1975-9-1 &mdash Stricken by U.S. Navy and sold to Greece
    • 1991-2-26 &mdash Decommissioned by Greek Navy
    • 1994 &mdash Donated as museum ship
    • 2000-12-14 &mdash Transferred to Salamis Naval Base, Greece, for restoration
    • 2002-6-26 &mdash Museum (Park of Maritime Tradition in Faliron Bay, Greece, near Athens) [581]
    • 1942-4-16 &mdash Laid Down, Boston Navy Yard
    • 1942-7-18 &mdash Launched, Boston Navy Yard
    • 1943-6-8 &mdash Commissioned at Boston Navy Yard
    • 1946-7-5 &mdash Decommissioned at Long Beach, California
    • 1959-9-15 &mdash Loaned to Greece
    • 1959-9-15 &mdash Commissioned into Greek Navy ( A/T Aspis [&Alpha/&Tau &Alpha&sigma&pi&iota&sigmaf] D-06) at Long Beach, California
    • 1975-9-1 &mdash Stricken by U.S. Navy and sold to Greece
    • 1991-2-1 &mdash Decommissioned and stricken by Greek Navy
    • 1997-5 &mdash Scrapped at Perama, Greece
    • 1942-4-16 &mdash Laid Down, Boston Navy Yard
    • 1942-7-18 &mdash Launched, Boston Navy Yard
    • 1943-7-6 &mdash Commissioned at Boston Navy Yard
    • 1946-12-10 &mdash Decommissioned at San Diego
    • 1960-2-9 &mdash Loaned to Greece
    • 1960-2-9 &mdash Commissioned into Greek Navy ( A/T Lonchi [&Alpha/&Tau &Lambda&omicron&gamma&chi&eta] D-56) at Long Beach, California
    • 1975-9-1 &mdash Stricken and sold by U.S. Navy
    • 1990-10-1 &mdash Decommissioned by Greek Navy
    • 1990-10-10 &mdash Stricken by Greek Navy
    • 1997 &mdash Scrapped at Aliaga, Turkey
    • 1942-11-9 &mdash Laid Down, Boston Navy Yard
    • 1943-3-19 &mdash Launched, Boston Navy Yard
    • 1943-8-19 &mdash Commissioned, Boston Navy Yard
    • 1945-3-26 &mdash War Loss struck mine between Kerama Retto and Okinawa, then drifted aground on Tokashiki
    • 1945-4-28 &mdash Stricken
    • 1957 &mdash Hulk donated to government of Ryukyu Islands
    • 1942-11-9 &mdash Laid Down, Boston Navy Yard
    • 1943-3-19 &mdash Launched, Boston Navy Yard
    • 1943-9-16 &mdash Commissioned at Boston Navy Yard
    • 1946-7-2 &mdash Decommissioned at San Diego
    • 1972-11-1 &mdash Stricken and authorized for use as target in Harpoon tests
    • 1973-11-1 &mdash Intentionally sunk as target by Harpoon missile, probably off Southern California
    • 1943-3-19 &mdash Laid Down, Boston Navy Yard
    • 1943-7-4 &mdash Launched, Boston Navy Yard
    • 1943-11-10 &mdash Commissioned at Boston Navy Yard
    • 1945-4-6 &mdash Damaged beyond repair by five Japanese kamikaze aircraft off Iejima, near Okinawa
    • 1945-11-20 &mdash Decommissioned
    • 1946-3-28 &mdash Stricken
    • 1947-10-1 &mdash Scrapped at Mare Island Naval Shipyard, Vallejo, California
    • 1941-12-30 &mdash Laid Down, Charleston Navy Yard, South Carolina
    • 1942-6-24 &mdash Launched, Charleston Navy Yard, South Carolina
    • 1943-3-4 &mdash Commissioned at Charleston, South Carolina
    • 1946-6-14 &mdash Decommissioned at San Diego
    • 1972-11-1 &mdash Stricken and authorized for use as target in Harpoon tests
    • 1975-5-11 &mdash Intentionally sunk as target off San Clemente Island, California
    • 1942-5-9 &mdash Laid Down, Charleston Navy Yard, South Carolina
    • 1942-8-8 &mdash Launched, Charleston Navy Yard, South Carolina
    • 1943-4-3 &mdash Commissioned at Charleston, South Carolina
    • 1946-6-25 &mdash Decommissioned at San Diego
    • 1972-11-1 &mdash Stricken and authorized for use as target in Harpoon tests
    • 1976-6-29 &mdash Intentionally sunk as target by Mk-71 8&rdquo/55 Major Caliber Lightweight Gun laser-guided fire from Forrest Sherman-class destroyer Hull about 2,000 yards off southern San Clemente Island, California [588]
    • 1942-5-9 &mdash Laid Down, Charleston Navy Yard, South Carolina
    • 1942-8-8 &mdash Launched, Charleston Navy Yard, South Carolina
    • 1943-5-15 &mdash Commissioned
    • 1946-5-31 &mdash Decommissioned at San Diego
    • 1968-5-1 &mdash Stricken
    • 1970-4-2 &mdash Sold for scrap to National Metal & Steel, Los Angeles
    • 1943-1-20 &mdash Laid Down, Charleston Navy Yard, South Carolina
    • 1943-4-7 &mdash Launched, Charleston Navy Yard, South Carolina
    • 1943-10-25 &mdash Commissioned
    • 1945-9-24 &mdash Decommissioned
    • 1968-5-1 &mdash Stricken
    • 1970-4-2 &mdash Sold for scrap to National Metal & Steel, Los Angeles
    • 1943-1-20 &mdash Laid Down, Charleston Navy Yard, South Carolina
    • 1943-4-7 &mdash Launched, Charleston Navy Yard, South Carolina
    • 1943-11-4 &mdash Commissioned
    • 1945-6-16 &mdash War Loss torpedoed and then hit by Japanese kamikaze airplane off Senaga Shima, near Okinawa
    • 1945-7-11 &mdash Stricken
    • 1957 &mdash Hulk donated to the government of the Ryukyu Islands
    • 1941-11-26 &mdash Laid Down, Puget Sound Navy Yard, Bremerton, Washington
    • 1943-1-10 &mdash Launched, Puget Sound Navy Yard, Bremerton, Washington
    • 1944-4-3 &mdash Commissioned at Puget Sound Navy Yard, Bremerton, Washington
    • 1946-4-30 &mdash Decommissioned at San Diego
    • 1957-9-1 &mdash Towed to Long Beach Naval Shipyard, California, and fitted with scientific instruments in preparation for use as target in nuclear weapons tests
    • 1958 &mdash Used as target and contaminated by radioactivity during Operation Hardtack I underwater atomic bomb tests and near Enewetak Atoll
    • 1961-6-1 &mdash Stricken
    • 1962-3-8 &mdash Intentionally torpedoed off San Clemente Island, California [592]
    • 1941-11-26 &mdash Laid Down, Puget Sound Navy Yard, Bremerton, Washington
    • 1943-1-10 &mdash Launched, Puget Sound Navy Yard, Bremerton, Washington
    • 1944-5-4 &mdash Commissioned at Puget Sound Navy Yard, Bremerton, Washington
    • 1946-7-9 &mdash Decommissioned at San Diego
    • 1957-9-1 &mdash Towed to Long Beach Naval Shipyard, California, and fitted with scientific instruments in preparation for use as target in nuclear weapons tests
    • 1958 &mdash Used as target and contaminated by radioactivity during Operation Hardtack I underwater atomic bomb tests and near Enewetak Atoll
    • 1963-6-1 &mdash Stricken assigned to Roosevelt Roads, Puerto Rico, as target vessel
    • 1975-4-15 &mdash Sunk as a missile target in shallow waters at Bahía Salina del Sur, Vieques, Puerto Rico [593]
    • 1975-4-16 &mdash Some parts reportedly salvaged by Andy International Inc. of Miami&dagger
    • 1943-8-10 &mdash Laid Down, Puget Sound Navy Yard, Bremerton, Washington
    • 1944-9-25 &mdash Launched, Puget Sound Navy Yard, Bremerton, Washington
    • 1944-11-4 &mdash Commissioned at Puget Sound Navy Yard, Bremerton, Washington
    • 1946-5-31 &mdash Decommissioned at Long Beach, California
    • 1973-4-15 &mdash Stricken
    • 1973-11-1 &mdash Offered by Defense Reutilization and Marketing Service (DRMS) for scrapping
    • 1973-12-3 &mdash Sold for scrap to Zidell Explorations Inc. of Portland, Oregon&dagger
    • 1943-8-10 &mdash Laid Down, Puget Sound Navy Yard, Bremerton, Washington
    • 1944-9-25 &mdash Launched, Puget Sound Navy Yard, Bremerton, Washington
    • 1944-11-18 &mdash Commissioned at Puget Sound Navy Yard, Bremerton, Washington
    • 1946-3-1 &mdash Decommissioned at San Diego
    • 1971-1-2 &mdash Stricken
    • 1972-6-6 &mdash Sold for scrap to Union Minerals & Alloys Corp., New York City&dagger
    • 1943-8-10 &mdash Laid Down, Puget Sound Navy Yard, Bremerton, Washington
    • 1944-9-25 &mdash Launched, Puget Sound Navy Yard, Bremerton, Washington
    • 1945-2-8 &mdash Commissioned at Puget Sound Navy Yard, Bremerton, Washington
    • 1946-6-14 &mdash Decommissioned
    • 1950-7-15 &mdash Recommissioned
    • 1972-3 &mdash Declared uneconomical to upgrade
    • 1972-7-1 &mdash Decommissioned at San Diego and stricken by U.S. Navy sold to Brazil
    • 1972-7-6 &mdash Commissioned into Brazilian Navy ( CT Maranhão D-33) at San Diego
    • 1990-6-15 &mdash Sold for scrap by Brazilian Navy
    • 1990-7-6 &mdash Decommissioned and stricken by Brazilian Navy
    • 1943-8-10 &mdash Laid Down, Puget Sound Navy Yard, Bremerton, Washington
    • 1944-9-25 &mdash Launched, Puget Sound Navy Yard, Bremerton, Washington
    • 1945-2-22 &mdash Commissioned at Puget Sound Navy Yard, Bremerton, Washington
    • 1946-8-9 &mdash Decommissioned at San Diego
    • 1968-5-1 &mdash Stricken
    • 1970-4-2 &mdash Sold to National Metal & Steel Corp. of Los Angeles for scrapping
    • 1942-9-21 &mdash Laid Down, Bath Iron Works, Maine
    • 1943-2-17 &mdash Launched, Bath Iron Works, Maine
    • 1943-4-23 &mdash Commissioned at Boston Navy Yard
    • 1946-5-21 &mdash Decommissioned at San Diego
    • 1951-2-26 &mdash Recommissioned at San Diego
    • 1965-3-26 &mdash Decommissioned at Philadelphia
    • 1974-12-1 &mdash Stricken
    • 1975-7-31 &mdash Sold for scrap to Boston Metals Co. of Baltimore
    • 1942-10-12 &mdash Laid Down, Bath Iron Works, Maine
    • 1943-3-7 &mdash Launched, Bath Iron Works, Maine
    • 1943-5-11 &mdash Commissioned at Boston Navy Yard
    • 1946-7-26 &mdash Decommissioned at Charleston, South Carolina
    • 1951-4-6 &mdash Recommissioned at Charleston, South Carolina
    • 1971-4-7 &mdash Declared surplus
    • 1971-8-10 &mdash Sold to Argentina
    • 1971-8-17 &mdash Decommissioned at Treasure Island, San Francisco, and stricken by U.S. Navy
    • 1971-8-17 &mdash Commissioned into Argentine Navy ( ARA Almirante Domecq García D-23) at Treasure Island, San Francisco
    • 1982-11-30 &mdash Decommissioned and stricken by Argentine Navy at Puerto Belgrano Naval Base
    • 1983-5-4 &mdash Transferred to Naval Operations Command as target ship
    • 1986-11-19 &mdash Intentionally sunk during test of Exocet missiles and torpedoes by Argentine Navy, 120 miles south of Mar del Plata, Argentina
    • 1942-10-28 &mdash Laid Down, Bath Iron Works, Maine
    • 1943-3-21 &mdash Launched, Bath Iron Works, Maine
    • 1943-5-28 &mdash Commissioned
    • 1946-5-31 &mdash Decommissioned
    • 1951-5-19 &mdash Recommissioned at Long Beach, California
    • 1958-6-27 &mdash Decommissioned
    • 1963-5-16 &mdash Loaned to South Korea
    • 1963-5-16 &mdash Commissioned into South Korean Navy ( ROKS Chung Mu DD-911/DD-91)
    • 1975-6-2 &mdash Stricken and sold by U.S. Navy
    • 1983 &mdash Decommissioned by South Korean Navy used as stationary training ship
    • 1993 &mdash Retired and presumed scrapped
    • 1942-11-23 &mdash Laid Down, Bath Iron Works, Maine
    • 1943-4-4 &mdash Launched, Bath Iron Works, Maine
    • 1943-6-15 &mdash Commissioned at Boston
    • 1947-1-15 &mdash Decommissioned at San Diego
    • 1951-3-24 &mdash Recommissioned at Long Beach, California
    • 1960-7-30 &mdash Decommissioned at Boston
    • 1961-1-23 &mdash Loaned to Colombia
    • 1961-1-23 &mdash Commissioned into Colombian Navy ( Antioquia DD-01)
    • 1973-12-20 &mdash Decommissioned and stricken by Colombian Navy
    • 1975-6-2 &mdash Stricken by U.S. Navy
    • 1975-6-2 &mdash Sold for scrap by Colombian Navy at Cartagena
    • 1942-12-7 &mdash Laid Down, Bath Iron Works, Maine
    • 1943-4-24 &mdash Launched, Bath Iron Works, Maine
    • 1943-6-29 &mdash Commissioned
    • 1946-3-20 &mdash Decommissioned at Charleston, South Carolina
    • 1951-9-7 &mdash Recommissioned at Charleston, South Carolina
    • 1960-5-1 &mdash Decommissioned at Philadelphia
    • 1974-12-1 &mdash Stricken
    • 1975-7-31 &mdash Sold by Defense Reutilization and Marketing Service (DRMS) for scrapping to Boston Metals Co. of Baltimore
    • 1942-12-21 &mdash Laid Down, Bath Iron Works, Maine
    • 1943-5-8 &mdash Launched, Bath Iron Works, Maine
    • 1943-7-16 &mdash Commissioned
    • 1946-5-31 &mdash Decommissioned at San Diego
    • 1951-11-9 &mdash Recommissioned at San Diego
    • 1958-5-27 &mdash Decommissioned at Long Beach, California
    • 1961-8-7 &mdash Loaned (Military Assistance Program) to Argentina
    • 1961-8-7 &mdash Commissioned into Argentine Navy ( ARA Rosales D-22)
    • 1975-9-1 &mdash Stricken and sold by U.S. Navy
    • 1981-8-7 &mdash Decommissioned and stricken by Argentine Navy at Puerto Belgrano Naval Base
    • 1981-12-29 &mdash Sold for scrap to Padovani Shipyard, Campana, Argentina
    • 1982 &mdash Scrapped
    • 1942-12-30 &mdash Laid Down, Charleston Navy Yard, South Carolina
    • 1943-5-29 &mdash Launched, Charleston Navy Yard, South Carolina
    • 1943-11-24 &mdash Commissioned at Charleston, South Carolina
    • 1946-7-16 &mdash Decommissioned at San Diego
    • 1971-4-14 &mdash Stricken
    • 1972-5-30 &mdash Sold for scrap to Levin Metals Corp. of San Jose, California&dagger
    • 1943-1-11 &mdash Laid Down, Bath Iron Works, Maine
    • 1943-5-22 &mdash Launched, Bath Iron Works, Maine
    • 1943-6-30 &mdash Commissioned
    • 1946-7-6 &mdash Decommissioned at Charleston, South Carolina
    • 1951-4-27 &mdash Recommissioned
    • 1960-4-27 &mdash Decommissioned at Norfolk, Virginia stored at Philadelphia Naval Inactive Ship Maintenance Facility
    • 1974-12-1 &mdash Stricken and transferred (probably to U.S. Maritime Administration)
    • 1975-1982 &mdash Major parts, including four Mk-14 21-inch torpedo tubes, removed for Kidd restoration at Philadelphia
    • 1983 (circa) &mdash Sunk as target off Puerto Rico
    • 1943-2-1 &mdash Laid Down, Bath Iron Works, Maine
    • 1943-6-5 &mdash Launched, Bath Iron Works, Maine
    • 1943-8-17 &mdash Commissioned
    • 1946-4-30 &mdash Decommissioned at Charleston, South Carolina
    • 1951-6-7 &mdash Recommissioned
    • 1969-10-1 &mdash Decommissioned and stricken by U.S. Navy sold and delivered to Turkey
    • 1970-10-6 &mdash Commissioned into Turkish Navy ( TCG İzmit D342)
    • 1980-8-15 &mdash Decommissioned by Turkey
    • 1981 &mdash Sold for scrap by Turkey
    • 1943-2-18 &mdash Laid Down, Bath Iron Works, Maine
    • 1943-6-28 &mdash Launched, Bath Iron Works, Maine
    • 1943-8-31 &mdash Commissioned at Boston Navy Yard
    • 1946-7-19 &mdash Decommissioned at Charleston, South Carolina
    • 1951-5-4 &mdash Recommissioned at Charleston, South Carolina
    • 1970-1-20 &mdash Decommissioned at San Diego and stricken used as target ship for Pacific Missile Range, Point Mugu, California&dagger
    • 1974-5-19 &mdash Intentionally sunk by gunfire 10 miles north of Santa Catalina Island, California
    • 1943-3-8 &mdash Laid Down, Bath Iron Works, Maine
    • 1943-7-10 &mdash Launched, Bath Iron Works, Maine
    • 1943-9-16 &mdash Commissioned at Boston
    • 1946-7-5 &mdash Decommissioned at Charleston, South Carolina
    • 1951-5-3 &mdash Recommissioned at Charleston, South Carolina
    • 1957-3-4 &mdash Decommissioned at Long Beach, California
    • 1972-3-6 &mdash Stricken
    • 1973-8-27 &mdash Sold for scrap to Zidell Explorations Inc. of Portland, Oregon bridge and antiaircraft gun retained as exhibits at Columbia River Maritime Museum in Astoria, Oregon
    • 1942-7-14 &mdash Laid Down, Gulf Shipbuilding Corp., Chickasaw, Alabama
    • 1943-7-25 &mdash Launched, Gulf Shipbuilding Corp., Chickasaw, Alabama
    • 1944-4-12 &mdash Commissioned at Mobile, Alabama
    • 1947-1-31 &mdash Decommissioned at Charleston Naval Shipyard, South Carolina
    • 1951-9-7 &mdash Recommissioned Charleston Naval Shipyard, South Carolina
    • 1963-12-30 &mdash Decommissioned at Portsmouth, Virginia stored at Philadelphia
    • 1974-12-1 &mdash Stricken
    • 1976-4-14 &mdash Sold to Union Metals & Alloys, New York City, for scrap
    • 1942-10-12 &mdash Laid Down, Gulf Shipbuilding Corp., Chickasaw, Alabama
    • 1943-10-25 &mdash Launched, Gulf Shipbuilding Corp., Chickasaw, Alabama
    • 1944-6-7 &mdash Commissioned at Alabama State Docks, Mobile
    • 1946-7-3 &mdash Decommissioned at Charleston Naval Shipyard, South Carolina
    • 1951-8-3 &mdash Recommissioned at Charleston Naval Shipyard, South Carolina
    • 1964-6-30 &mdash Decommissioned
    • 1974-12-1 &mdash Stricken
    • 1975-11-1 &mdash Offered for sale as scrap by Defense Reutilization and Marketing Service
    • 1976-4-12 &mdash Sold to Luria Bros. & Co. of Philadelphia for scrap
    • 1942-11-15 &mdash Laid Down, Gulf Shipbuilding Corp., Chickasaw, Alabama
    • 1943-12-19 &mdash Launched, Gulf Shipbuilding Corp., Chickasaw, Alabama
    • 1944-8-2 &mdash Commissioned at Alabama State Docks, Mobile
    • 1946-4-15 &mdash Decommissioned at Charleston, South Carolina
    • 1951-3-8 &mdash Recommissioned at Charleston, South Carolina
    • 1954-2-26 &mdash Decommissioned at Philadelphia
    • 1967-2-28 &mdash Loaned to Turkey and delivered
    • 1967-8-2 &mdash Commissioned into Turkish Navy ( TCG İzmir D341)
    • 1973-2-1 &mdash Stricken by U.S. Navy
    • 1973-2-15 &mdash Ownership returned to United States immediately sold (Foreign Military Sales program) to Turkey
    • 1986-7-25 &mdash Decommissioned by Turkish Navy
    • 1987 &mdash Sold for scrap by Turkey
    • 1942-9-24 &mdash Laid Down, Bethlehem Steel Corp., Staten Island, New York City
    • 1943-4-3 &mdash Launched, Bethlehem Steel Corp., Staten Island, New York City
    • 1943-7-23 &mdash Commissioned
    • 1946-5-21 &mdash Decommissioned at Long Beach, California
    • 1951-9-10 &mdash Recommissioned
    • 1957-12-20 &mdash Decommissioned at Boston Navy Yard stored at South Boston Naval Annex
    • 1974-2-1 &mdash Stricken
    • 1974-5-10 &mdash Sold (Security Assistance Program) to Chile
    • 1974-5-10 &mdash Acquired by Chilean Navy as barracks ship and for spare parts to maintain ex- Rooks and ex- Wadleigh . Later scrapped
    • 1942-10-24 &mdash Laid Down, Bethlehem Steel Corp., Staten Island, New York City
    • 1943-5-3 &mdash Launched, Bethlehem Steel Corp., Staten Island, New York City
    • 1943-8-23 &mdash Commissioned
    • 1946-6-14 &mdash Decommissioned at San Diego
    • 1950-12-16 &mdash Recommissioned at San Diego
    • 1966-8-1 &mdash Decommissioned and stricken
    • 1966-12-18 &mdash Intentionally sunk by aircraft weapons 40 miles south of San Clemente Island, California
    • 1942-10-1 &mdash Laid Down, Federal Shipbuilding & Dry Dock Co., Kearny, New Jersey
    • 1943-2-6 &mdash Launched, Federal Shipbuilding & Dry Dock Co., Kearny, New Jersey
    • 1943-3-20 &mdash Commissioned
    • 1946-3-30 &mdash Decommissioned at Charleston, South Carolina
    • 1951-5-3 &mdash Recommissioned
    • 1960-4-29 &mdash Decommissioned
    • 1974-12-1 &mdash Stricken
    • 1975-9-21 &mdash Sold to North American Smelting of Wilmington, Delaware, for scrap
    • 1942-10-16 &mdash Laid Down, Federal Shipbuilding & Dry Dock Co., Kearny, New Jersey
    • 1943-2-28 &mdash Launched, Federal Shipbuilding & Dry Dock Co., Kearny, New Jersey
    • 1943-4-9 &mdash Commissioned
    • 1946-12-20 &mdash Decommissioned at San Diego
    • 1972-12-1 &mdash Stricken
    • 1973-12-3 &mdash Sold for scrap to American Ship Dismantlers Inc. of Portland, Oregon
    • 1942-10-16 &mdash Laid Down, Federal Shipbuilding & Dry Dock Co., Kearny, New Jersey
    • 1943-2-28 &mdash Launched, Federal Shipbuilding & Dry Dock Co., Kearny, New Jersey
    • 1943-4-23 &mdash Commissioned
    • 1946-12-10 &mdash Decommissioned at San Diego
    • 1951-3-28 &mdash Recommissioned
    • 1964-6-19 &mdash Decommissioned at Philadelphia
    • 1974-12-1 &mdash Stricken
    • 1974-12-2 &mdash Donated as floating museum
    • 1982-5-32 &mdash Arrived under tow at Baton Rouge, Louisiana
    • 1983-8-27 &mdash Museum opened at Baton Rouge, Louisiana
    • 1986-1-14 &mdash Designated National Historic Landmark
    • 1943-3-19 &mdash Laid Down, Boston Navy Yard
    • 1943-7-4 &mdash Launched, Boston Navy Yard
    • 1943-12-14 &mdash Commissioned
    • 1946-6-20 &mdash Decommissioned at Long Beach, California
    • 1971-4-15 &mdash Stricken
    • 1973-5-30 &mdash Sold to Levin Metals Corp. of Richmond, California, for scrap
    • 1943-7-4 &mdash Laid Down, Boston Navy Yard
    • 1943-10-6 &mdash Launched, Boston Navy Yard
    • 1944-1-26 &mdash Commissioned at Boston Navy Yard
    • 1946-7-1 &mdash Decommissioned at San Diego
    • 1959-3-10 &mdash Loaned to Japan at Long Beach, California, and towed to Yokosuka
    • 1959-3-10 &mdash Commissioned into Japanese Navy ( JDS Ariake DD-183) at Long Beach, California
    • 1959-4-16 &mdash Arrived under tow at Yokosuka, Japan
    • 1960-4-12 &mdash Began service in Japanese Navy
    • 1974-3-9 &mdash Decommissioned by Japanese Navy at Yokosuka
    • 1974-3-10 &mdash Returned to the U.S. Navy in Japan determined to be uneconomical to upgrade
    • 1974-3-18 &mdash Stricken by U.S. Navy
    • 1976-8-21 &mdash Sold for scrap to China Dismantled Vessel Trading Corp. of Taipei, Taiwan dismantled in South Korea
    • 1943-7-4 &mdash Laid Down, Boston Navy Yard
    • 1943-10-6 &mdash Launched, Boston Navy Yard
    • 1944-2-23 &mdash Commissioned at Boston Navy Yard
    • 1946-12-10 &mdash Decommissioned at San Diego
    • 1959-3-10 &mdash Loaned to Japan at Long Beach, California, and towed to Yokosuka
    • 1959-3-10 &mdash Commissioned into Japanese Navy ( JDS Yugure DD-184) at Long Beach, California
    • 1959-4-16 &mdash Arrived Yokosuka, Japan, under tow
    • 1960-1 &mdash Began service in Japanese Navy
    • 1974-3-9 &mdash Decommissioned by Japanese Navy
    • 1974-3-10 &mdash Returned to the U.S. Navy in Japan determined to be uneconomical to upgrade
    • 1974-3-18 &mdash Stricken by U.S. Navy
    • 1976 &mdash Sold for scrap to China Dismantled Vessel Trading Corp. of Taipei, Taiwan dismantled in South Korea
    • 1942-12-30 &mdash Laid Down, Charleston Navy Yard, South Carolina
    • 1943-5-29 &mdash Launched, Charleston Navy Yard, South Carolina
    • 1943-12-4 &mdash Commissioned at Charleston Navy Yard, South Carolina
    • 1945-4-16 &mdash Struck and heavily damaged by kamikaze aircraft and bomb off Okinawa
    • 1945-9-20 &mdash Declared unfit after failing sea trials off California
    • 1946-7-9 &mdash Deactivated and placed in reserve, in commission, at San Diego
    • 1947-1-15 &mdash Decommissioned at San Diego
    • 1968-6-30 &mdash Stricken
    • 1969-8-24 &mdash Used as target off San Clemente Island, California
    • 1976-4 &mdash Sold for scrapping to Luria Bros. & Co.
    • 1976-7 &mdash Scrapped
    • 1942-11-14 &mdash Laid Down, Federal Shipbuilding & Dry Dock Co., Kearny, New Jersey
    • 1943-3-28 &mdash Launched, Federal Shipbuilding & Dry Dock Co., Kearny, New Jersey
    • 1943-5-21 &mdash Commissioned at Brooklyn Navy Yard, New York City
    • 1946-8-5 &mdash Decommissioned at San Pedro, Los Angeles
    • 1951-7-18 &mdash Recommissioned at Long Beach, California
    • 1969-9-21 &mdash Decommissioned
    • 1969-9-26 &mdash Stricken
    • 1971-2-17 &mdash Sold for scrap to Chou&rsquos Iron & Steel Co. of Kaoshiung, Taiwan
    • 1942-11-14 &mdash Laid Down, Federal Shipbuilding & Dry Dock Co., Kearny, New Jersey
    • 1943-3-28 &mdash Launched, Federal Shipbuilding & Dry Dock Co., Kearny, New Jersey
    • 1943-5-31 &mdash Commissioned
    • 1945-12-19 &mdash Decommissioned at San Diego
    • 1950-7-18 &mdash Recommissioned
    • 1954-5-14 &mdash Decommissioned
    • 1972-10-1 &mdash Stricken
    • 1974-1-2 &mdash Sold for scrap to Southern Scrap Material Co. of New Orleans
    • 1942-12-9 &mdash Laid Down, Federal Shipbuilding & Dry Dock Co., Kearny, New Jersey
    • 1943-4-18 &mdash Launched, Federal Shipbuilding & Dry Dock Co., Kearny, New Jersey
    • 1943-6-11 &mdash Commissioned
    • 1946-7-16 &mdash Decommissioned at Charleston, South Carolina
    • 1951-6-7 &mdash Recommissioned at Charleston, South Carolina
    • 1960-6-29 &mdash Decommissioned
    • 1967-1-14 &mdash Loaned to Turkey and handed over
    • 1967-5-12 &mdash Commissioned into Turkish Navy ( TCG İstanbul D340)
    • 1973-2-1 &mdash Stricken by U.S. Navy and sold to Turkey
    • 1986-7-25 &mdash Decommissioned by Turkish Navy
    • 1987 &mdash Stricken by Turkish Navy and sold for scrap
    • 1943-2-8 &mdash Laid Down, Federal Shipbuilding & Dry Dock Co., Kearny, New Jersey
    • 1943-6-12 &mdash Launched, Federal Shipbuilding & Dry Dock Co., Kearny, New Jersey
    • 1943-7-24 &mdash Commissioned
    • 1946-7-15 &mdash Decommissioned at Charleston, South Carolina
    • 1951-7-3 &mdash Recommissioned at Charleston, South Carolina
    • 1960-5-2 &mdash Decommissioned at Norfolk, Virginia
    • 1974-12-1 &mdash Stricken
    • 1975-7-31 &mdash Sold for scrap to Consolidated Steel Co. of Brownsville, Texas
    • 1943-3-2 &mdash Laid Down, Federal Shipbuilding & Dry Dock Co., Kearny, New Jersey
    • 1943-6-20 &mdash Launched, Federal Shipbuilding & Dry Dock Co., Kearny, New Jersey
    • 1943-8-7 &mdash Commissioned
    • 1946-7-19 &mdash Decommissioned at Charleston, South Carolina
    • 1951-5-4 &mdash Recommissioned at Charleston, South Carolina
    • 1957-12-13 &mdash Decommissioned at Philadelphia
    • 1961-8-16 &mdash Loaned to Argentina
    • 1961-8-19 &mdash Commissioned into Argentine Navy ( ARA Espora D-21)
    • 1974-11 &mdash Final Argentine Navy cruise deactivated
    • 1975-9-1 &mdash Stricken by U.S. Navy and sold to Argentina
    • 1977 &mdash Decommissioned and stricken by Argentina sold to Aranta S.A. (possibly in 1978) for scrap
    • 1979-2 &mdash Delivered to Aranta S.A. for scrapping
    • 1943-3-3 &mdash Laid Down, Federal Shipbuilding & Dry Dock Co., Kearny, New Jersey
    • 1943-6-20 &mdash Launched, Federal Shipbuilding & Dry Dock Co., Kearny, New Jersey
    • 1943-8-19 &mdash Commissioned at New York Navy Yard
    • 1946-7-16 &mdash Decommissioned at Charleston, South Carolina
    • 1951-6-4 &mdash Recommissioned at Charleston, South Carolina
    • 1960-5-2 &mdash Decommissioned at Norfolk, Virginia
    • 1974-12-1 &mdash Stricken
    • 1977-2-22 &mdash Sold to Union Minerals & Alloys of New York City for scrap
    • 1943-3-4 &mdash Laid Down, Federal Shipbuilding & Dry Dock Co., Kearny, New Jersey
    • 1943-7-4 &mdash Launched, Federal Shipbuilding & Dry Dock Co., Kearny, New Jersey
    • 1943-9-3 &mdash Commissioned at New York Navy Yard
    • 1946-7-11 &mdash Decommissioned at Charleston, South Carolina
    • 1951-8-3 &mdash Recommissioned at Charleston, South Carolina
    • 1958-3-11 &mdash Decommissioned at Philadelphia
    • 1974-12-1 &mdash Stricken
    • 1976-4-12 &mdash Sold to Luria Bros. & Co. of Philadelphia for scrap
    • 1943-3-12 &mdash Laid Down, Federal Shipbuilding & Dry Dock Co., Kearny, New Jersey
    • 1943-7-4 &mdash Launched, Federal Shipbuilding & Dry Dock Co., Kearny, New Jersey
    • 1943-9-10 &mdash Commissioned
    • 1946-12-10 &mdash Decommissioned at San Diego
    • 1951-5-19 &mdash Recommissioned
    • 1957-12-20 &mdash Decommissioned at Philadelphia
    • 1968-11-15 &mdash Loaned to South Korea
    • 1968-11-15 &mdash Commissioned into South Korean Navy ( ROKS Pusan [sometimes spelled Busan ] D-93/DD-913)
    • 1975-6-2 &mdash Stricken by U.S. Navy and sold to South Korea
    • 1989 &mdash Decommissioned and stricken by South Korea scrapped
    • 1943-3-31 &mdash Laid Down, Federal Shipbuilding & Dry Dock Co., Kearny, New Jersey
    • 1943-8-1 &mdash Launched, Federal Shipbuilding & Dry Dock Co., Kearny, New Jersey
    • 1943-9-22 &mdash Commissioned at New York City
    • 1945-12-15 &mdash Decommissioned at San Diego
    • 1951-10-31 &mdash Recommissioned at San Diego
    • 1963-12-30 &mdash Decommissioned at Philadelphia
    • 1974-12-1 &mdash Stricken
    • 1975-8-14 &mdash Sold for scrap to Consolidated Steel Corporation of Brownsville, Texas&dagger
    • 1943-3-31 &mdash Laid Down, Federal Shipbuilding & Dry Dock Co., Kearny, New Jersey
    • 1943-8-1 &mdash Launched, Federal Shipbuilding & Dry Dock Co., Kearny, New Jersey
    • 1943-9-29 &mdash Commissioned
    • 1946-1-10 &mdash Decommissioned at San Diego
    • 1951-5-19 &mdash Recommissioned at Long Beach, California
    • 1957-12-18 &mdash Decommissioned at Philadelphia
    • 1967-8-1 &mdash Loaned to Brazil
    • 1967-8-2 &mdash Commissioned into Brazilian Navy ( CT Piauí D-31)
    • 1973-3-15 &mdash Stricken by U.S. Navy
    • 1973-4-11 &mdash Sold to Brazil by U.S. Navy
    • 1989-6-2 &mdash Decommissioned at Rio de Janeiro Naval Base and stricken by Brazilian Navy reported scrapped
    • 1943-4-19 &mdash Laid Down, Federal Shipbuilding & Dry Dock Co., Kearny, New Jersey
    • 1943-8-29 &mdash Launched, Federal Shipbuilding & Dry Dock Co., Kearny, New Jersey
    • 1943-10-16 &mdash Commissioned
    • 1945-12-1 &mdash Decommissioned at San Diego
    • 1951-4-27 &mdash Recommissioned
    • 1969-7-19 &mdash Decommissioned and Stricken
    • 1970-7 &mdash Sold to Zidell Explorations of Portland, Oregon, for scrap
    • 1943-6-14 &mdash Laid Down, Federal Shipbuilding & Dry Dock Co., Kearny, New Jersey
    • 1943-10-17 &mdash Launched, Federal Shipbuilding & Dry Dock Co., Kearny, New Jersey
    • 1943-11-19 &mdash Commissioned
    • 1947-1-15 &mdash Decommissioned
    • 1950-12-29 &mdash Recommissioned at Long Beach, California
    • 1963-9-21 &mdash Collided with Fletcher-class destroyer Gregory off Southern California both ships declared uneconomical to repair
    • 1963-12-16 &mdash Decommissioned at San Diego
    • 1965-4-1 &mdash Stricken
    • 1966-1-4 &mdash Sold to National Metal & Steel Corp. of Terminal Island, Los Angeles, for scrap
    • 1943-6-30 &mdash Laid Down, Federal Shipbuilding & Dry Dock Co., Kearny, New Jersey
    • 1943-11-14 &mdash Launched, Federal Shipbuilding & Dry Dock Co., Kearny, New Jersey
    • 1943-12-20 &mdash Commissioned
    • 1946-4-30 &mdash Decommissioned at San Diego
    • 1951-7-6 &mdash Recommissioned at Los Angeles Naval Base
    • 1960-11-30 &mdash Decommissioned by U.S. Navy at Barcelona and loaned to Spain
    • 1960-12-1 &mdash Commissioned into Spanish Navy ( Jorge Juan 45/D-25) at Barcelona
    • 1972-10-1 &mdash Sold (Foreign Military Sales program) by U.S. Navy
    • 1988-11-15 &mdash Decommissioned and stricken by Spanish Navy, then sold for scrap
    • 1943-6-30 &mdash Laid Down, Federal Shipbuilding & Dry Dock Co., Kearny, New Jersey
    • 1943-11-14 &mdash Launched, Federal Shipbuilding & Dry Dock Co., Kearny, New Jersey
    • 1943-12-30 &mdash Commissioned
    • 1946-5-28 &mdash Decommissioned at San Diego
    • 1951-7-6 &mdash Recommissioned at Los Angeles Naval Base
    • 1963-12-30 &mdash Decommissioned at Philadelphia
    • 1974-12-1 &mdash Stricken
    • 1976-6-10 &mdash Sold to Ship&rsquos Inc. of Camden, New Jersey, for scrap
    • 1943-7-6 &mdash Laid Down, Federal Shipbuilding & Dry Dock Co., Kearny, New Jersey
    • 1943-10-17 &mdash Launched, Federal Shipbuilding & Dry Dock Co., Kearny, New Jersey
    • 1943-11-24 &mdash Commissioned
    • 1946-5-31 &mdash Decommissioned at San Diego
    • 1951-2-26 &mdash Recommissioned
    • 1954-1-13 &mdash Decommissioned at Charleston, South Carolina
    • 1960 &mdash Moved to Philadelphia
    • 1974-12-1 &mdash Stricken
    • 1975-8-14 &mdash Sold to Trebor Marine Corp. of Camden, New Jersey, for scrap
    • 1942-10-29 &mdash Laid Down, Bethlehem Steel Corp., San Pedro, Los Angeles
    • 1943-5-2 &mdash Launched, Bethlehem Steel Corp., San Pedro, Los Angeles
    • 1943-9-30 &mdash Commissioned at Terminal Island, Los Angeles
    • 1947-1-15 &mdash Decommissioned at San Diego
    • 1951-3-28 &mdash Recommissioned at San Diego
    • 1970-1-2 &mdash Decommissioned and stricken
    • 1972-2-11 &mdash Intentionally sunk off west coast of San Clemente Island, California, by Walleye missile&dagger
    • 1942-12-12 &mdash Laid Down, Bethlehem Steel Corp., San Pedro, Los Angeles
    • 1943-6-12 &mdash Launched, Bethlehem Steel Corp., San Pedro, Los Angeles
    • 1943-10-30 &mdash Commissioned at San Pedro, Los Angeles
    • 1945-11-1 &mdash Decommissioned at San Diego and moved to Long Beach, California
    • 1951-4-27 &mdash Recommissioned at Long Beach, California
    • 1969-11-7 &mdash Decommissioned
    • 1975-3-1 &mdash Stricken
    • 1976 &mdash Designated for use as target
    • 1982-7-18 &mdash Intentionally sunk as target off California by Tomahawk cruise missile fired from the Sturgeon-class submarine Guitarro
    • 1942-12-19 &mdash Laid Down, Bethlehem Steel Corp., San Francisco
    • 1943-6-25 &mdash Launched, Bethlehem Steel Corp., San Francisco
    • 1944-2-11 &mdash Commissioned
    • 1946-12-1 &mdash Decommissioned at San Diego
    • 1951-11-14 &mdash Recommissioned
    • 1957-9-2 &mdash Decommissioned
    • 1974-12-1 &mdash Stricken
    • 1977-2-17 &mdash Intentionally sunk as target off Puerto Rico
    • 1943-1-10 &mdash Laid Down, Bethlehem Steel Corp., San Francisco
    • 1943-8-1 &mdash Launched, Bethlehem Steel Corp., San Francisco
    • 1944-3-9 &mdash Commissioned at San Francisco
    • 1946-3-1 &mdash Decommissioned
    • 1950-11-21 &mdash Recommissioned
    • 1969-10-1 &mdash Decommissioned at San Diego and stricken
    • 1972-1-26 &mdash Sold for scrap to Chou&rsquos Iron & Steel Co. of Kaoshiung, Taiwan
    • 1942-11-24 &mdash Laid Down, Bethlehem Steel Corp., Staten Island, New York City
    • 1943-6-1 &mdash Launched, Bethlehem Steel Corp., Staten Island, New York City
    • 1943-9-21 &mdash Commissioned
    • 1945-12-20 &mdash Decommissioned at San Diego
    • 1951-1-26 &mdash Recommissioned at San Diego
    • 1952-11-16 &mdash Collided with Fletcher-class destroyer Porter in dense fog off Virginia slight damage [685]
    • 1969-9-6 &mdash Decommissioned at Long Beach, California
    • 1975-3-1 &mdash Stricken
    • 1997-2-27 &mdash Used as gunnery target and scuttled 140 miles west of Ensenada, Mexico
    • 1943-2-3 &mdash Laid Down, Bethlehem Steel Corp., Staten Island, New York City
    • 1943-6-30 &mdash Launched, Bethlehem Steel Corp., Staten Island, New York City
    • 1943-10-25 &mdash Commissioned at Brooklyn Navy Yard, New York City
    • 1946-12-10 &mdash Decommissioned at San Diego
    • 1951-4-27 &mdash Recommissioned
    • 1968-4-27 &mdash Decommissioned at Long Beach, California, by U.S. Navy and loaned to South Korea
    • 1968-4-27 &mdash Commissioned into South Korean Navy ( ROKS Seoul DD-92/DD-912) at Long Beach, California
    • 1975-6-2 &mdash Stricken and sold by U.S. Navy
    • 1982-1-15 &mdash Decommissioned by South Korean Navy, stricken and scrapped
    • 1943-3-6 &mdash Laid Down, Bethlehem Steel Corp., Staten Island, New York City
    • 1943-7-30 &mdash Launched, Bethlehem Steel Corp., Staten Island, New York City
    • 1943-11-22 &mdash Commissioned at Brooklyn Navy Yard
    • 1946-6-14 &mdash Decommissioned at San Diego
    • 1950-5-23 &mdash Recommissioned at San Diego
    • 1971-11-24 &mdash Declared unfit for service oldest destroyer in the U.S. Navy
    • 1972-7-15 &mdash Decommissioned at Naval Reserve Center Pier, Tacoma, Washington, and stricken stored at Bremerton, Washington [687]
    • 1974-4-9 &mdash Sold for scrap to Zidell Explorations of Portland, Oregon&dagger
    • 1943-3-22 &mdash Laid Down, Bath Iron Works, Maine
    • 1943-7-25 &mdash Launched, Bath Iron Works, Maine
    • 1943-9-30 &mdash Commissioned
    • 1946-12-10 &mdash Decommissioned at San Diego
    • 1951-11-14 &mdash Recommissioned
    • 1963-12-30 &mdash Decommissioned at Philadelphia
    • 1974-12-1 &mdash Stricken
    • 1976-6-10 &mdash Sold for scrap to Ships Inc. of Camden, New Jersey&dagger
    • 1943-4-5 &mdash Laid Down, Bath Iron Works, Maine
    • 1943-8-7 &mdash Launched, Bath Iron Works, Maine
    • 1943-10-19 &mdash Commissioned at Boston Navy Yard
    • 1946-6-20 &mdash Decommissioned at San Diego
    • 1951-10-3 &mdash Recommissioned at San Diego
    • 1962-6-28 &mdash Decommissioned at Norfolk, Virginia
    • 1962-7-26 &mdash Loaned to Chile
    • 1962-7-26 &mdash Commissioned into Chilean Navy ( Blanco Encalada D-14)
    • 1975-9-1 &mdash Stricken by U.S. Navy and sold to Chile
    • 1982-4-19 &mdash Decommissioned by Chilean Navy and then used as barracks ship
    • 1982-6-8 &mdash Authorized by Chilean Navy for disposal
    • 1991-9-28 &mdash Sunk off southern Chile by Harpoon missile launched from the U.S. Spruance-class destroyer O&rsquobannon during Operation Unitas XXXII exercise
    • 1943-4-26 &mdash Laid Down, Bath Iron Works, Maine
    • 1943-8-28 &mdash Launched, Bath Iron Works, Maine
    • 1943-11-5 &mdash Commissioned at Boston
    • 1944-7-24 &mdash Heavily damaged off Tinian by shore gunfire
    • 1946-4-30 &mdash Decommissioned
    • 1973-4-15 &mdash Stricken
    • 1973-12-3 &mdash Sold for scrap to American Ship Dismantlers Inc. of Portland, Oregon
    • 1943-5-10 &mdash Laid Down, Bath Iron Works, Maine
    • 1943-9-11 &mdash Launched, Bath Iron Works, Maine
    • 1943-11-19 &mdash Commissioned at Boston
    • 1946-4-23 &mdash Decommissioned at San Diego
    • 1951-7-1 &mdash Moved to Long Beach, California
    • 1959-1-1 &mdash Moved to Stockton, California
    • 1970-10-1 &mdash Stricken
    • 1971-12-16 &mdash Sold for scrap to Chou&rsquos Iron & Steel Co. of Kaoshiung, Taiwan
    • 1943-2-21 &mdash Laid Down, Bethlehem Steel Corp., San Pedro, Los Angeles
    • 1943-8-1 &mdash Launched, Bethlehem Steel Corp., San Pedro, Los Angeles
    • 1943-11-27 &mdash Commissioned
    • 1945-7-28 &mdash War Loss sunk by Japanese Kamikaze float biplane west of Kerama Retto, near Okinawa
    • 1943-3-18 &mdash Laid Down, Bethlehem Steel Corp., San Pedro, Los Angeles
    • 1943-9-12 &mdash Launched, Bethlehem Steel Corp., San Pedro, Los Angeles
    • 1943-12-31 &mdash Commissioned at Bethlehem Steel Corp., San Pedro, Los Angeles
    • 1946-5-28 &mdash Decommissioned at San Pedro, Los Angeles
    • 1951-9-8 &mdash Recommissioned at San Diego
    • 1960-4-29 &mdash Decommissioned at Norfolk Naval Shipyard, Virginia
    • 1974-12-1 &mdash Stricken
    • 1974-12-2 &mdash Loaned for use as Museum, Boston Navy Yard
    • 1943-5-2 &mdash Laid Down, Bethlehem Steel Corp., San Pedro, Los Angeles
    • 1943-10-31 &mdash Launched, Bethlehem Steel Corp., San Pedro, Los Angeles
    • 1944-2-14 &mdash Commissioned
    • 1946-5-31 &mdash Decommissioned at San Diego
    • 1951-2-26 &mdash Recommissioned at Long Beach, California
    • 1958-1-10 &mdash Decommissioned
    • 1968-5-10 &mdash Loaned to Brazil
    • 1968-5-10 &mdash Commissioned into Brazilian Navy ( CT Santa Catarina D-32) at Philadelphia
    • 1973-3-15 &mdash Stricken and Sold by U.S. Navy
    • 1988-12-28 &mdash Decommissioned by Brazilian Navy
    • 1989-8-31 &mdash Used as Sea Skua missile target, but not sunk
    • 1990-3-20 &mdash Intentionally sunk by gunfire about 80 miles south of Rio de Janeiro
    • 1943-6-13 &mdash Laid Down, Bethlehem Steel Corp., San Pedro, Los Angeles
    • 1943-12-12 &mdash Launched, Bethlehem Steel Corp., San Pedro, Los Angeles
    • 1944-3-20 &mdash Commissioned
    • 1946-4-24 &mdash Decommissioned at San Diego
    • 1951-1-26 &mdash Recommissioned at Long Beach, California
    • 1969-11-15 &mdash Decommissioned at Hunter&rsquos Point, San Francisco, and stricken by U.S. Navy sold and delivered to Turkey
    • 1970-10-6 &mdash Commissioned into Turkish Navy ( TCG İçel D344)
    • 1980-8-15 &mdash Decommissioned and Stricken by Turkish Navy, then scrapped
    • 1981 &mdash Stricken by Turkish Navy, then scrapped
    • 1943-4-3 &mdash Laid Down, Bethlehem Steel Corp., Staten Island, New York City
    • 1943-8-30 &mdash Launched, Bethlehem Steel Corp., Staten Island, New York City
    • 1943-12-20 &mdash Commissioned
    • 1946-10-18 &mdash Decommissioned
    • 1951-3-24 &mdash Recommissioned at Long Beach, California
    • 1960-12-15 &mdash Decommissioned at Boston by U.S. Navy and loaned to Peru
    • 1960-12-15 &mdash Commissioned into Peruvian Navy ( BAP Villar DD-71) at Boston
    • 1974-1-15 &mdash Stricken by U.S. Navy and sold to Peru
    • 1980-4-21 &mdash Approved for decommissioning by Peruvian Navy
    • 1980-5-13 &mdash Decommissioned and stricken by Peruvian Navy
    • 1980-5-28 &mdash Stripped of spare parts
    • 1980 &mdash Used as target during Exocet SS38 missile test fired by BAP Ferre , but not sunk
    • 1980 &mdash Sold for scrap by Peru
    • 1943-5-3 &mdash Laid Down, Bethlehem Steel Corp., Staten Island, New York City
    • 1943-9-30 &mdash Launched, Bethlehem Steel Corp., Staten Island, New York City
    • 1944-1-17 &mdash Commissioned
    • 1947-2-3 &mdash Decommissioned at Long Beach, California
    • 1951-8-17 &mdash Recommissioned at Long Beach, California
    • 1960-11-8 &mdash Decommissioned at Norfolk, Virginia
    • 1961-7-20 &mdash Loaned to Brazil
    • 1961-7-20 &mdash Commissioned into Brazilian Navy ( CT Paraná D-29) at Norfolk Navy Yard, Virginia
    • 1973-8-1 &mdash Stricken and sold by U.S. Navy
    • 1982-4-4 &mdash Decommissioned and stricken by Brazilian Navy, then scrapped
    • 1943-6-1 &mdash Laid Down, Bethlehem Steel Corp., Staten Island, New York City
    • 1943-10-30 &mdash Launched, Bethlehem Steel Corp., Staten Island, New York City
    • 1944-2-14 &mdash Commissioned
    • 1946-4-30 &mdash Decommissioned at San Diego
    • 1951-10-31 &mdash Recommissioned
    • 1957-9-1 &mdash Decommissioned at Boston
    • 1962-3-6 &mdash Tow line parted in storm en route to Philadelphia from Boston grounded at Beach Haven Inlet, New Jersey
    • 1962-4 &mdash Towed to Philadelphia, but found uneconomical to repair
    • 1963-2-1 &mdash Stricken
    • 1963-10-21 &mdash Sold for scrap to Union Minerals & Alloys Corp. of New York City
    • 1943-6-7 &mdash Laid Down, Seattle-Tacoma Shipbuilding Corp., Seattle
    • 1944-2-14 &mdash Launched, Seattle-Tacoma Shipbuilding Corp., Seattle
    • 1944-6-3 &mdash Commissioned
    • 1946-6-29 &mdash Decommissioned
    • 1951-2-8 &mdash Recommissioned
    • 1960-10-24 &mdash Decommissioned at Philadelphia
    • 1960-11-3 &mdash Loaned to Spain
    • 1960-11-3 &mdash Commissioned into Spanish Navy ( Alcalá Galiano 44/D-24) at Philadelphia
    • 1972-10-1 &mdash Stricken by U.S. Navy and sold to Spain
    • 1988-12-15 &mdash Decommissioned and stricken by Spanish Navy, then scrapped
    • 1943-7-6 &mdash Laid Down, Todd Pacific Shipyards, Seattle
    • 1944-3-13 &mdash Launched, Todd Pacific Shipyards, Seattle
    • 1944-6-24 &mdash Commissioned
    • 1946-7-3 &mdash Decommissioned at Charleston, South Carolina
    • 1951-2-9 &mdash Recommissioned
    • 1952-11-16 &mdash Collided with Fletcher-class destroyer Picking in dense fog off Virginia [800]
    • 1953-8-10 &mdash Decommissioned at Norfolk, Virginia
    • 1972-10-1 &mdash Stricken
    • 1974-3-21 &mdash Sold for scrap
    • 1943-8-3 &mdash Laid Down, Seattle-Tacoma Shipbuilding Corp., Seattle
    • 1944-4-10 &mdash Launched, Seattle-Tacoma Shipbuilding Corp., Seattle
    • 1944-7-8 &mdash Commissioned
    • 1945-4-6 &mdash War Loss heavily damaged by several Japanese kamikaze aircraft off Okinawa and scuttled by gunfire from Cassin Young in the East China Sea, 20 miles northwest of Iheya Island near Okinawa
    • 1943-8-31 &mdash Laid Down, Seattle-Tacoma Shipbuilding Corp., Tacoma, Washington
    • 1944-5-8 &mdash Launched, Seattle-Tacoma Shipbuilding Corp., Tacoma, Washington
    • 1944-7-29 &mdash Commissioned
    • 1947-1-15 &mdash Decommissioned at San Diego
    • 1951-4-27 &mdash Recommissioned at San Diego
    • 1963-9-21 &mdash Collided with Fletcher-class destroyer McDermut off Southern California both ships declared uneconomical to repair
    • 1964-2-1 &mdash Decommissioned at San Diego
    • 1966-5-1 &mdash Stricken
    • 1966-5-20 &mdash Used as stationary training ship Indoctrinator in San Diego
    • 1971-1-8 &mdash Removed from service in San Diego and designated for use as target off San Clemente Island, California
    • 1971-3-4 &mdash Grounded on San Clemente Island, California, in storm
    • 1972 &mdash Towed to west shore of San Clemente Island, California, and destroyed
    • 1943-9-13 &mdash Laid Down, Seattle-Tacoma Shipbuilding Corp., Seattle
    • 1944-5-22 &mdash Launched, Seattle-Tacoma Shipbuilding Corp., Seattle
    • 1944-8-19 &mdash Commissioned at Seattle-Tacoma Shipbuilding Corp., Seattle
    • 1945-5-3 &mdash War Loss sunk by Japanese kamikaze aircraft 40 miles west of Kumejima, Okinawa
    • 1943-10-27 &mdash Laid Down, Seattle-Tacoma Shipbuilding Corp., Seattle
    • 1944-6-6 &mdash Launched, Seattle-Tacoma Shipbuilding Corp., Seattle
    • 1944-9-2 &mdash Commissioned at Todd Pacific Shipyard, Harbor Island, Seattle
    • 1946-6-11 &mdash Decommissioned at San Diego
    • 1951-5-19 &mdash Recommissioned at San Diego
    • 1962-7-26 &mdash Loaned to Chile
    • 1962-7-28 &mdash Decommissioned by U.S. Navy at Norfolk, Virginia
    • 1962-7-28 &mdash Commissioned into Chilean Navy ( Cochrane D-15)
    • 1975-9-1 &mdash Stricken and sold by U.S. Navy
    • 1981 &mdash Decommissioned
    • 1982-4-19 &mdash Stricken by Chilean Navy
    • 1983 &mdash Scrapped

    Details of the intentional sinking are vague. During the exercise the Taiwanese Zwaardvis-class submarine Hai Lung fired a SUT (Surface and Underwater Torpedo) at Kwei Yang in shallow waters off the Yilan County coast, but the torpedo missed and nearly sank the submarine the torpedo was found by some fishermen a few days later, beached many miles away and still armed.

    Meanwhile, Hai Lung fired a second SUT, but its guide wire fouled in the shallows and it too went missing. A third SUT apparently did the trick, sinking Kwei Yang without further incident. In another botched test that day, a Sidewinder air-to-air missile failed to explode.

    According to Taiwan News, the fiasco caused the Taiwanese Navy to hastily schedule more exercises, known as Lien Hsing 90, exactly a month later on 2003-10-14 this resulted in the sinking of another Fletcher target vessel, An Yang (ex- Kimberly ).

    In a newspaper article on 2010-7-6, a port official told La Jornada Michoacán that the ship was no longer seaworthy. Her said that a last-minute offer by Universidad Michoacana de San Nicolás Hidalgo to convert the ship into a combined museum, classroom and conference center was refused because of the poor condition of the hull, and because the bid came too late. Several other attempts to repatriate the ship to the United States failed because of the high legal, preparation and towing costs.

    The condemnation order took effect on 2010-8-2. On 2010-8-28, an article in the newspaper La Opinión de Michoacán noted that the ship had just been towed to the Ecomar ship dismantling terminal after sitting at the granary pier for 3½ years instead of the 15 days promised by Beauchamp Tower when they took possession in 2006.


    Contents

    Drogba is a member of the Bété people [19] He was born in Abidjan, Ivory Coast, and at the age of five was sent to France by his parents to live with his uncle, Michel Goba, a professional footballer. However, Drogba soon became homesick and returned to Abidjan after three years. [20] His mother nicknamed him "Tito", after president Josip Broz Tito of Yugoslavia, whom she admired greatly. [21] He played football every day in a car park in the city but his return to the Ivory Coast was short lived. Both of his parents lost their jobs and he again returned to live with his uncle. [20] In 1991, his parents also travelled to France first to Vannes and then, in 1993, setting in Antony in the Paris suburbs, at which point the 15-year-old Drogba returned to live with them and his siblings. [22] It was here that he began playing team football more frequently, joining a local youth side. Drogba then joined the semi-professional club Levallois, gaining a reputation as a prolific scorer in the youth team and impressing the coach with his professional attitude. His performances earned him a place in the senior squad but despite scoring in his debut, the 18-year-old Ivorian failed to make an impression on Jacques Loncar, the first team coach. [23]

    Le Mans

    When Drogba finished school he moved to the city Le Mans to study accountancy at university and he had to change clubs, becoming an apprentice at Ligue 2 club Le Mans. However, his first two years there were marred by injuries and he was physically struggling to cope with the training and match schedule. [20] Former Le Mans coach Marc Westerloppe later remarked that "it took Didier four years to be capable of training every day and playing every week". Furthermore, Drogba's complicated family life meant that he had never attended a football academy and only began daily football training as a fully grown adult. [24]

    By age 21, Drogba realised that he had to establish himself as a player soon or else he would have little chance of becoming a professional footballer. [25] He made his first team debut for Le Mans soon thereafter and signed his first professional contract in 1999. The same year, he and his Malian wife Alla had their first child, Isaac. He grew into his new responsibilities, later stating: "Isaac's birth was a turning point in my life, it straightened me out". [20] His first season, in which he scored seven goals in thirty games, boded well for the future, but during the following season he did not live up to expectations. Drogba lost his place to Daniel Cousin due to injury, then upon his return, he failed to score throughout the remainder of the season. However, he returned to form the following season, scoring five goals in 21 appearances. [26]

    Guingamp

    Halfway through the 2001–02 season Ligue 1 club Guingamp consolidated months of interest with a transfer offer and Drogba left Le Mans for a fee of £80,000. [20] The second half of the 2001–02 season saw Drogba make 11 appearances and score three goals for Guingamp. While his contributions helped the club avoid relegation, the coaching staff remained unconvinced of their new young striker. [27] However, the next season he rewarded his coaches' patience, scoring 17 goals in 34 appearances and helping Guingamp finish seventh, a record league finish. [20] He credited his teammates for his impressive season, highlighting the contributions of winger Florent Malouda, a long time friend of Drogba, as a key factor in his goalscoring prolificity that season. [25] His strong goal scoring record attracted interest from larger clubs and at the end of the season, he moved to Ligue 1 side Olympique de Marseille for a fee of £3.3 million. [24]

    Marseille

    After a switch of coaches, Drogba retained his position in the team, scoring 19 goals and winning the National Union of Professional Footballers (UNFP) Player of the Year award. He also scored five goals in that season's UEFA Champions League and six in the UEFA Cup. At the end of the season, he was bought by Chelsea as the club's then record signing for £24 million. [25] His shirt from his only season at Marseille is also framed in the basilica of Marseille, Notre-Dame de la Garde, which he presented to the church before the 2004 UEFA Cup Final. [28]

    Chelsea

    2004–06

    Signing for Chelsea in July 2004 for £24 million, [29] Drogba scored in his third game for the club with a header against Crystal Palace. [30] His season was interrupted when he pulled a stomach muscle against Liverpool which kept him out of action for over two months. [31] Chelsea won the Premier League, only their second English top-flight championship and their first in 50 years, [32] and the League Cup. Later, Drogba scored in extra time in a 3–2 final win against Liverpool at the Millennium Stadium, as well as reaching the semi-finals of the Champions League. Drogba scored a somewhat disappointing 16 goals in a total of 40 games for Chelsea in his first season: ten in the Premier League, five in the Champions League and one in the League Cup final. [33]

    Drogba started the 2005–06 season by scoring two goals in a Community Shield win over Arsenal. His reputation was marred amidst accusations of cheating during Chelsea's 2–0 win over Manchester City. Replays showed that he had used his hand to control the ball before scoring the second of his two goals. [34] This occurred just a week after a similar incident against Fulham where the goal was disallowed. [35] Chelsea went on to retain the league title with two games to play, becoming only the second club to win back-to-back English titles in the Premier League era. [36] Again Drogba finished with 16 goals for the season, 12 in the Premier League, two in the Community Shield, one in the Champions League and one in the FA Cup. [37]

    2006–07

    After the departure of Damien Duff to Newcastle United, Drogba switched from the number 15 shirt he had worn for Chelsea since 2004 to the number 11 shirt vacated by Duff. [38] The season was a personal success for Drogba as he hit 33 goals in all competitions (more than his tally in the previous two seasons combined), including 20 in the Premier League to win the Golden Boot. In doing so, he became the first Chelsea player since Kerry Dixon in 1984–85 to reach 30 goals in a season, scoring 20 in the Premier League, six in the Champions League, three in the FA Cup and four in the League Cup.

    Among the highlights were scoring game-winners from outside the penalty area against Liverpool, Everton and Barcelona, a 93rd-minute equaliser against Barcelona at the Camp Nou and both Chelsea's goals in their 2–1 League Cup final win over Arsenal. [39] He also completed two hat-tricks one against Watford and the other against Levski Sofia in the Champions League, Chelsea's first hat-trick in European competition since Gianluca Vialli in the Cup Winners' Cup in 1997. [40] In his last competitive game that season, he scored the winning goal against Manchester United in the first FA Cup final at the new Wembley Stadium. [41] This also meant he became the only player to score in both English domestic finals in the same season and win both. [17]

    In January 2007, Drogba was named the Ivorian Player of the Year, ahead of Kader Keïta, Aruna Dindane, and Kolo Touré. In March, he was named African Footballer of the Year for the first time, ahead of Samuel Eto'o and Chelsea teammate Michael Essien. [42] His performances during the season saw him named in the PFA Premier League Team of the Year and runner-up to Cristiano Ronaldo in the PFA Player of the Year awards. [43]

    Drogba faced problems off the pitch during the end of the season as his transfer from Marseille to Chelsea in July 2004 came under scrutiny. The Stevens inquiry in June 2007 expressed concerns because of the lack of co-operation from agents Pinhas Zahavi and Barry Silkman. [44]

    2007–08

    The 2007–08 season began badly for Drogba as he expressed his doubts about the departure of manager José Mourinho. He was reportedly in tears when Mourinho told him he was leaving the club, and said "Mourinho's departure destroys a certain familiarity we had at the club. Many of us used to play first and foremost for the manager. Now we need to forget those feelings and find another source of motivation". [45] Following these claims, Drogba told France Football Magazine "I want to leave Chelsea. Something is broken with Chelsea, The damage is big in the dressing room". [46] Despite having signed a four-year contract with the club in 2006, Drogba reportedly pointed out several favoured clubs in the interview, identifying Barcelona, Real Madrid, Milan or Internazionale as possible future destinations, [47] he later admitted he regretted this and was 100% committed to Chelsea. [46] Drogba made it up to the fans by scoring in Chelsea's 2–0 victory over Middlesbrough on 20 October 2007, against Schalke 04 in the Champions League four days later, and two goals against Manchester City. In December 2007, Drogba was voted fourth (after Kaká, Lionel Messi and Cristiano Ronaldo) for the 2007 FIFA World Player of the Year. [48] [49]

    Drogba continued scoring goals but suffered an injury at the training ground and decided to have an operation on his knee. He was unable to play for four weeks and missed key games against Valencia, Arsenal and Liverpool. [50] Drogba returned from injury to play in an FA Cup third round match against Queens Park Rangers and wore the captain's armband for the last 30 minutes he was on the pitch, but that was his last performance for Chelsea before international duty at the Africa Cup of Nations. [51] Upon his return, Drogba scored a goal in the 2008 League Cup Final, making him the all-time leading scorer in League Cup Finals with four goals, but could not help prevent Chelsea fall to a 2–1 defeat at the hands of Tottenham Hotspur. [52] He scored both goals in a key 2–1 victory against Arsenal on 23 March 2008, bringing Chelsea equal on points with leaders Manchester United. [53] [54]

    On 26 April 2008, Drogba faced controversy after a clash with Manchester United defender Nemanja Vidić. The Serbian centre-back had to have stitches under his lip after losing a tooth in the clash. There was discussion whether Drogba had the intention or not to injure his rival. The debate also called into question an earlier incident on 26 November 2006 where Drogba elbowed Vidić. Manchester United manager Sir Alex Ferguson expressed concerns over elbowing in the Premier League. [55] Despite media speculation, Drogba's yellow card for the clash was deemed adequate punishment by the Football Association. [56]

    Controversy still dogged the player as before the UEFA Champions League semi-final second leg clash with Liverpool, Drogba was accused of diving by Liverpool manager Rafael Benítez. Benítez claimed to have compiled a four-year dossier of Drogba's "diving" antics but Drogba hit back at Benítez in an interview. [57] On 30 April 2008, Drogba scored two goals in the second leg of the semi-final against Liverpool, which Chelsea won 3–2 at Stamford Bridge. [58] This was the first time Chelsea had beaten Liverpool in the semi-finals of the Champions League, having lost their previous two meetings to Liverpool. This also led to Chelsea reaching their first Champions League Final. Drogba became Chelsea's top scorer in European competition, the two goals he scored put his total at 17, surpassing Peter Osgood's record of 16. [29] Drogba was sent off in the 117th minute of the 2008 UEFA Champions League Final against Manchester United for slapping defender Vidić, [59] becoming only the second player to be sent off in a European Cup final – after Jens Lehmann in 2006 – and the first for violent conduct. [60] Chelsea went on to lose 6–5 on penalties after a 1–1 draw in extra time. Chelsea assistant boss Henk ten Cate revealed Drogba was due to take the decisive fifth spot-kick in the shootout. Team captain John Terry took his place but missed after slipping whilst taking the penalty. [61]

    2008–09

    Drogba suffered a string of injuries early on in the 2008–09 season and struggled to regain fitness, missing games from August to November due to knee problems. [62] [63] He scored his first goal of the season in mid-November but there was little reason to celebrate: he incurred disciplinary action and a three-match ban for throwing a coin back into the stands and Chelsea suffered a League Cup defeat against Burnley. [64] [65] Drogba scored his second goal of the season in a 2–1 victory against CFR Cluj in the UEFA Champions League, [66] while his first Premier League goal of the season came in a 2–0 win against West Bromwich Albion in late December 2008. [67] Having missed many games through injury and suspension, Drogba had lost his first team place and manager Scolari favoured playing Nicolas Anelka as a lone striker rather than pairing the two. However, he resolved to regain his position in the squad. [68]

    Upon the temporary appointment of Guus Hiddink in early February following the sacking of Scolari, Drogba enjoyed a rejuvenation of sorts, returning to his goal-scoring form with four goals in five games after the new manager took over. [69] [70] His revival in form saw him net twice against Bolton Wanderers, and four times in four Champions League matches, one in each leg of the last sixteen and quarter-final of the competition against Juventus and Liverpool respectively, with these goals ensuring Chelsea's passage into the semi-finals. Just four days after his Champions League games, Drogba scored a late goal in the FA Cup semi-final match against Arsenal after Frank Lampard's pass found Drogba and he carefully rounded Arsenal goalkeeper Łukasz Fabiański before passing the ball into Arsenal's empty net. [71] Drogba also caused controversy after Chelsea's Champions League semi-final defeat at the hands of Barcelona. Feeling that many decisions had gone against Chelsea, substituted Drogba confronted referee Tom Henning Øvrebø after the final whistle. He received a yellow card in the process and was recorded shouting "It's a fucking disgrace" [72] into a live television camera. [73] On 17 June 2009, UEFA subsequently handed him a six-game European ban with the final two games suspended. The ban then was reduced by one match after an appeal by Chelsea. [74] In the 2009 FA Cup Final, Drogba scored Chelsea's first and equalising goal as they went on to win 2–1. [75] This was his sixth goal in a major cup final in England. Although Drogba had previously expressed his desire to switch clubs, he decided to remain with the Blues under new coach Carlo Ancelotti and signed a new contract. [76]

    2009–10

    Drogba began the 2009–10 season in fine form for Chelsea, netting a penalty during a shoot-out win in the Community Shield over Manchester United, before scoring twice in a 2–1 victory over Hull City. Drogba earned himself an assist when he was fouled in the penalty box to give Chelsea a penalty, which Frank Lampard converted, in a 3–1 victory over Sunderland. In Chelsea's third game of the season against West-London rivals Fulham, Drogba scored his third goal of the season. Drogba scored his fourth goal of the season, against Stoke City Chelsea ended winning the game 2–1 with a late strike from Malouda. [77] He added a fifth at home against London rivals Tottenham Hotspur on 20 September. [78]

    He scored his 100th goal for Chelsea in a 3–1 defeat against Wigan Athletic. Drogba was again important in the 2–0 win over title rivals Liverpool on 4 October. He assisted both goals, setting up Nicolas Anelka and Florent Malouda. [79] He then scored a glancing header against Blackburn on 24 October 2009, bringing his tally to eight goals in eleven appearances, scoring his third goal in as many games. Drogba continued his fine form scoring a header against Bolton Wanderers in a 4–0 win in the League Cup, Drogba went on to score a goal in the same week with another 4–0 win against Bolton Wanderers in the Premier League.

    After missing the first three Champions League matches for Chelsea with a ban for being unsportsmanlike, [80] Drogba started the fourth game against Spanish side Atlético Madrid. He scored two goals in the last ten minutes and the match ended 2–2. [81] On 29 November, Drogba scored a goal against London rivals Arsenal at the Emirates Stadium, the second of which a free kick from outside the box. [82] It brought his tally for the season to 14 goals in 16 games. On 12 December, Drogba continued his performance with two goals in 3–3 draw against Everton. [83] Between 3 and 30 January Drogba was on Africa Cup of Nations duty and came back on 2 February against Hull City where he scored a 40th-minute equaliser to tie the game 1–1. [84] On 24 March, Drogba scored his 30th goal of the season in an away game against Portsmouth.

    On 9 May, Drogba helped Chelsea to win the Premier League by scoring a hat-trick in an 8–0 win over Wigan Athletic. In doing so, he not only collected his third League winner's medal but also won the Golden Boot for the season, his second time doing so, by topping the chart with 29 league goals, beating Wayne Rooney to the title who remained on 26 goals. Both players had the same number of goals (26) before the start of their respective matches. However, during the game, Drogba appeared to be clearly angry with teammate and regular penalty taker Frank Lampard, after Lampard refused to let Drogba take a penalty which would lead Chelsea to go 2–0 up and give him a chance of winning the golden boot. Lampard scored the penalty, but Drogba did not celebrate with his teammates. Later on in the game though Ashley Cole was tripped in the box when Chelsea were already 5–0 up, and this time Lampard allowed Drogba to take the penalty, which he scored to go two goals clear of Rooney. [85]

    The following week, Drogba scored the only goal of the 2010 FA Cup Final against Portsmouth from a free-kick, keeping up his record of having scored in all six English cup finals (FA Cup and League Cup) in which he has played. [86]

    2010–11

    Drogba came on as a substitute for Anelka against Manchester United in the Community Shield, but could not help prevent Chelsea from succumbing to a 3–1 loss. [87] However, he started the Premier League season in fine form, continuing from where he left off on the last day of the previous campaign as he scored a hat-trick against West Bromwich Albion in a 6–0 victory. [88] In Chelsea's next game against Wigan Athletic at the DW Stadium, Drogba made three assists in another 6–0 win. [89]

    Drogba played the next game at home against Stoke City where he lasted the whole 90 minutes and scored his fourth Premier League goal of the season when he kicked home a penalty after Nicolas Anelka was brought down by Thomas Sørensen inside the box. [90] On 7 November 2010, Drogba missed the first half of Chelsea's 2–0 defeat by Liverpool at Anfield. [91] It was later revealed that he had been suffering from malaria for at least a month. He had first complained of feeling unwell before the October 2010 international break but the illness was only diagnosed on 8 November 2010. Having diagnosed the problem, Chelsea insisted that he would make a full recovery within days. [92]

    2011–12

    While playing against Norwich City on 27 August 2011, Drogba suffered a concussion in a collision with Norwich goalkeeper John Ruddy. [93] After missing two games, Drogba made his return to the Chelsea squad on 24 September against Swansea City. Drogba went on scoring his first goal of the season in a 4–1 win. [94] [95] On 29 November, Drogba rejected a new deal with Chelsea and was set to sign for the highest bidder. [96] On 31 December 2011, Drogba scored his 150th goal for Chelsea against Aston Villa, putting him level with Peter Osgood and Roy Bentley in terms of the club's top scorers of all time. Even though, Chelsea was leading with the penalty scored by Drobga, the game ended in a 3–1 loss for Chelsea. [97] Drogba scored his 99th Premier League goal for Chelsea on 25 February 2012, in a 3–0 win over Bolton Wanderers. [98] Drogba scored his 100th Premier League goal for Chelsea on 10 March 2012, in a 1–0 win over Stoke City. He is the first African player to reach that landmark. [99]

    —Teammate Frank Lampard on Drogba (who scored nine goals in nine finals for Chelsea) delivering in big games. [17]

    Drogba scored his seventh goal at Wembley Stadium against London rivals Tottenham Hotspur on 15 April, blasting the ball past former teammate Carlo Cudicini as Chelsea became 5–1 winners and secured a place in the FA Cup Final against Liverpool. [100] Three days later, he scored a vital goal as Chelsea beat Barcelona 1–0 at Stamford Bridge in the first leg of their UEFA Champions League Semi-final clash. [101] Drogba became the first player to score in four different FA Cup Finals, as he netted the winner in Chelsea's 2–1 triumph over Liverpool on 5 May. [102] Drogba also holds the record for most goals scored at the new Wembley Stadium with eight. [103]

    In the Champions League final on 19 May 2012, Drogba scored the equaliser from Juan Mata's corner in the 88th minute, taking Chelsea into extra time and then penalties. He also scored the winning penalty in the 4–3 penalty shootout that led Chelsea to the victory over Bayern Munich. [104] Sir Alex Ferguson remarked: "As far as I was concerned, he [Drogba] won the Champions League for Chelsea." [105] Drogba's headed effort marked his ninth goal in nine cup final appearances for Chelsea, Chelsea legend Gianfranco Zola spoke after the match about Drogba's ability in big games: "In all their very important matches he has put a stamp on it." [106] In November 2012, Drogba was named Chelsea's greatest ever player in a poll of 20,000 fans conducted by Chelsea Magazine. [107]

    Shanghai Shenhua

    On 22 May 2012, Chelsea released a note on their official website announcing that Drogba would leave the club when his contract expired at the end of June 2012. [108] [109] On 19 June 2012, Drogba declared he would be joining Chinese Super League side Shanghai Shenhua, linking up with his former Chelsea teammate Nicolas Anelka. It was reported that he signed a two-and-a-half-year deal where he will earn £200,000 a week. [110] [111] On 22 July, Drogba made his debut for Shanghai Shenhua in a 1–1 away draw against Guangzhou R&F, coming on as a substitute for Brazilian defender Moisés in the second half. He assisted Cao Yunding's equaliser in the 67th minute. On 4 August, he scored his first two goals in a 5–1 win against Hangzhou Greentown. [112] He scored two more goals on 25 August, both set up by Anelka, as Shenhua drew 3–3 with Shandong Luneng. [113] [114]

    Galatasaray

    On 28 January 2013, Drogba agreed to a one-and-a-half-year deal with Süper Lig team Galatasaray. [115] [116] He would earn a sign-on fee of €4 million plus basic wage of €4 million per season, €2 million for the remaining 2012–13 Süper Lig and €15,000 per match. [117] However, on 30 January 2013, Shenhua released a press release that Drogba would unilaterally breach his contract if he were to join Galatasaray. [118]

    Drogba argued that he had not been paid his wages by the club and asked FIFA, the sport's governing body, to invalidate his contract. In February 2013, FIFA granted a temporary license for him to play for Galatasaray pending the outcome of the contract dispute. [119] [120] [121]

    On 15 February, Drogba scored his debut goal for Galatasaray just five minutes after coming off the bench against Akhisar Belediyespor in a match that ended 2–1. [122] On 9 April, Drogba scored his first goal for Galatasaray in the Champions League quarter-final game, against Real Madrid. On 20 April, Drogba scored twice in a match against Elazigspor that ended 3–1. [123]

    He won his first title with Galatasaray on 5 May, with a 4–2 win over Sivasspor. [124] In Galatasary's derby match against Istanbul rivals Fenerbahçe on 12 May, Drogba and his Ivorian teammate Emmanuel Eboue were subjects of racist chants from opposing fans in the team's 2–1 loss, but no fine or bans were handed down to the supporters or the club. [125] On 11 August, he scored the only goal in the 2013 Turkish Super Cup against the same opponents, [126] and he scored two second-half goals in a 2–1 away win against fellow city rivals Beşiktaş on 22 September, although the match was abandoned due to hooliganism from fans of the opponents. [127]

    Return to Chelsea

    On 25 July 2014, Chelsea announced on their official website that Drogba completed his return to the club on a free transfer, and signed a one-year contract. [10] Speaking on his move back to the club, Drogba said:

    It was an easy decision. I couldn't turn down the opportunity to work with José Mourinho again. Everyone knows the special relationship I have with this club and it has always felt like home to me.

    Mourinho also commented on the transfer, saying: "He's coming because he's one of the best strikers in Europe. I know his personality very well and I know if he comes back he's not protected by history or what he's done for this club previously. He is coming with the mentality to make more history." [11] On 28 July 2014, Chelsea announced that Drogba would wear the number 15 shirt which he wore when he first signed for the club in 2004. [128] Mohamed Salah, who wore the number during the 2013–14 season, took over the number 17 shirt vacated by Eden Hazard. [129] On 15 August, however, it was announced that Drogba had been given back the number 11 shirt he previously wore at the club, with its previous occupant Oscar taking over the number 8 jersey vacated by Frank Lampard. [130]

    Drogba made his Premier League return for Chelsea in a 3–1 win away to Burnley, replacing winger Eden Hazard in the 84th minute at Turf Moor on 18 August 2014. [131] On 17 September he made the first start of his second spell, in a 1–1 home draw against Schalke 04 in Chelsea's first game of the Champions League group stage. [132] He scored his first goal in his second spell at Stamford Bridge on 21 October, converting a penalty kick in a 6–0 win over Maribor in the Champions League. [133] Five days later, with Chelsea's attack limited by injuries to Diego Costa and Loïc Rémy, Drogba started against Manchester United at Old Trafford, making his 350th appearance for the club. Early in the second-half, he headed in the first Premier League goal of his second spell although Robin van Persie equalised in added time. [134] He scored his 50th goal in European football against Schalke 04. [135]

    On 24 May 2015, Drogba announced that Chelsea's final game of the season against Sunderland would be his last as a Chelsea player. [136] He started the game as captain and was substituted with injury after half an hour, being carried off by his teammates in an eventual 3–1 win. [137]

    Montreal Impact

    On 27 July 2015, Drogba signed a Designated Player contract with Major League Soccer side Montreal Impact, believed to be 18 months in length. [138] [139] On 23 August, he made his debut in a 0–1 home loss against the Philadelphia Union, coming on as a substitute for Dilly Duka in the second half. On 5 September, Drogba scored a hat-trick on his first MLS start, the first player to do so in the league's history. Additionally, it was considered a "perfect hat-trick", with one goal scored with either foot and one with the head. [140] He was September's MLS Player of the Month after scoring 7 goals in his first 5 games in the league. [141]

    On 25 October, he scored both of the Impact's goals from back heels as the team came from behind to defeat Toronto FC 2–1 at home in the Canadian Classique the win gave Montreal the home advantage for their knock-out fixture against Toronto in the 2015 MLS Cup Playoffs. Drogba finished the 2015 MLS regular season with 11 goals in 11 games. [142] On 29 October, Drogba scored Montreal's third goal in a 3–0 home win over Toronto in the knock-out round of the Playoffs, to advance to the Eastern Conference Semi-finals for the first time in the club's history [143] they were eliminated by Columbus Crew SC. [144] He was named one of the three finalists for the 2015 MLS Newcomer of the Year Award. [145]

    During the MLS offseason, recently appointed Chelsea manager Guus Hiddink revealed interest in bringing on Drogba in a short-term coaching capacity after Drogba made a visit to Stamford Bridge to watch a Chelsea match with Hiddink and owner Roman Abramovich. [146] Montreal then reiterated their intent for Drogba to finish his contract with the club, [147] but were left uncertain until Drogba publicly confirmed his intent to play with Montreal for the 2016 MLS season on 3 March 2016. [148] [149] After beginning his preseason training in Qatar away from the club, Drogba joined the Impact for the second half of their preseason training in St. Petersburg, Florida. [150] On 3 March, club technical director Adam Braz announced that Drogba would not play matches on artificial turf to begin the season due to possible implications on his knee. [149]

    In July 2016, Drogba was included in the roster for the 2016 MLS All-Star Game, [151] scoring in a 2–1 defeat to Arsenal on 28 July. [152] On 14 October, following his exclusion from the starting lineup of a match against Toronto FC by manager Mauro Biello, Drogba refused to play for the team that night, removing his name from the squad. [153] With both his fitness, due to a lingering back injury, and his role in the team in question, Drogba did not travel with the team to, although he was in attendance at, their first postseason match at D.C. United, a 4–2 victory on 27 October. [154] [155] Drogba did not nearly experience the same level of success in his second regular season compared to the first, scoring only 10 goals while appearing in only 22 games, as Montreal reached the Conference Final of the 2016 Playoffs.

    Phoenix Rising

    On 12 April 2017, after nearly four months as a free agent and declining a move to Corinthians, [156] Drogba signed for USL side Phoenix Rising FC. He also became a minority owner of the club, making him the very first player-owner in football history. [157] [158]

    He made his debut for the club on 10 June 2017, and scored a goal and an assist, leading the team to a 2–1 victory over Vancouver Whitecaps FC 2. [159] In July 2017 Drogba attracted attention after scoring an impressive last-minute free kick in a game against Orange County to tie the game. [160] On 7 August, he scored with a powerful 40-yard free kick against LA Galaxy reserve side which was followed by his classic knee-slide goal celebration in front of the bench. [161] In November 2018, at the age of 40, Drogba scored against Orange County as Phoenix won the USL Western Conference. [162] On 8 November, Phoenix lost the USL Championship game 1–0 at Louisville City FC. Drogba retired later that month at the age of 40, [163] but remained with his final club to work on their bid to join MLS. [5]

    As the talisman of the team Drogba contributed to the Ivory Coast qualifying for its first ever FIFA World Cup, held in Germany in 2006. [164] Following the victory over Sudan that clinched World Cup qualification he also played a pivotal role in helping to end the Ivorian civil war by making an impassioned speech to the camera which resulted in a cease fire. [17]

    In February 2006, Drogba captained the Ivory Coast to their second Africa Cup of Nations final, scoring the only goal in their semi-final match with Nigeria and putting away the deciding spot-kick in their record-tying 12–11 penalty shootout quarter-final win over Cameroon. However, they lost in the final to Egypt 4–2 on penalty kicks after a 0–0 draw, with Drogba's shot being stopped by Egyptian goalkeeper Essam El Hadary. [165]

    At the 2006 FIFA World Cup, the Ivory Coast were drawn in a "group of death" with Serbia and Montenegro, the Netherlands and Argentina. [166] On 10 June 2006, Drogba scored the first World Cup goal of his career and of his country's history in the opening game against Argentina, but his team lost 2–1. [167] The Ivory Coast were eliminated from the World Cup after their next game, a 1–2 defeat to the Netherlands, but came from 0–2 down to win against Serbia and Montenegro 3–2 in their final group game, with Drogba watching from the sidelines following suspension after picking up a yellow card in the previous two games. [168]

    In the 2008 Africa Cup of Nations, the Ivory Coast were drawn in a group with Nigeria, Mali and underdogs Benin. Drogba scored two goals in the group stage, opening the scoring in the 4–1 win over Benin, [169] as well as in the 3–0 win over Mali. [170] In the quarter-finals, Drogba was on the score sheet once again in the 5–0 win over Guinea with the last four goals coming in the final twenty minutes. [171] The semi-final was a rematch of the 2006 final against Egypt, but it was to be the end of the road for Drogba and the Ivory Coast, losing 4–1 to the eventual champions. [172] On 9 February, Drogba lost 4–2 to hosts Ghana and thus ended their run in the playoffs. [173]

    Drogba scored six goals in five qualification games to help the Ivory Coast qualify for the 2010 FIFA World Cup. In the 2010 Africa Cup of Nations Drogba scored one goal in the 3–1 victory against Ghana in the group stage. The Ivory Coast reached the quarter-finals but lost 2–3 to Algeria. [174] [175] In March 2010, he was named as the 2009 African Footballer of the Year, his second time winning the award in his career. [176]

    On 4 June 2010, Drogba was injured in a friendly match with Japan. He received the injury in a high challenge from defender Túlio Tanaka. He fractured the ulna in his right arm and had an operation the next day in the hope of making the finals. [177] On 15 June 2010, Drogba was cleared by FIFA to play in the Ivory Coast's first group game against Portugal wearing a protective cast on his broken arm. [178] The match ended in a goalless draw at the Nelson Mandela Bay Stadium with Drogba coming on in the 65th minute. [179] On 20 June 2010, Drogba became the first player from an African nation to score against Brazil in a World Cup match, scoring with a header in the 78th minute as the Ivory Coast were defeated 1–3. [180] [181] On 25 June 2010, the Ivory Coast went out of the competition despite winning 3–0 against North Korea in their final match. [182]

    In the 2012 Africa Cup of Nations, the Ivory Coast were drawn in a group with Sudan, Angola and Burkina Faso. Drogba scored the first goal for his team in the tournament against Sudan and his only goal in the group stage. In the quarter-finals, Drogba scored twice in the 3–0 win over Equatorial Guinea but he missed a penalty kick where he could have scored hat-trick in the match and tournament. He did not score in the semi-final in which the Ivory Coast beat Mali 1–0. In the final against Zambia, Drogba missed a penalty kick in the last 15 minutes of the game, which ended with their loss for the second time by penalty shootout. [183]

    In June 2014, Drogba was named in the Ivory Coast's squad for the 2014 FIFA World Cup. [184] He won his 100th international cap in a pre-tournament friendly against Bosnia and Herzegovina, scoring a penalty kick in his side's 2–1 loss on 2 June. [185] In the Ivory Coast's opening match, he appeared as a second-half substitute with the team trailing 1–0 to Japan. Within five minutes of Drogba's arrival, Les Éléphants scored twice to win the match 2–1. [186] On 8 August 2014, Drogba announced his retirement from international football with a record of 65 goals in 105 appearances. [1] [16]

    Given his relatively late breakthrough into professional football, Drogba has often been described as a late bloomer, having signed his first professional contract with Le Mans at the age of 21. [187] He was noted for his physical strength, speed, ability in the air, powerful and accurate strikes, and ball retention. [188] [189] Initially a right-back in his youth, due to his ability to hold-up the ball with his back to goal, he often played as a centre-forward throughout his professional career, and has been described as "the definition of 'target man'" by Martin Li of Bleacher Report. [190] [191] [192] Richard Beech of the Daily Mirror says that his "powerful and intrusive approach made him the lone striker José Mourinho grew to admire, and made it nearly impossible for opposing teams to isolate him and freeze him out of the game." [193] Carl Anka of the BBC writes, "Drogba's robust playing style was so effective that he spearheaded the movement of the Premier League from the 4–4–2 era to a time where the 4–3–2–1 formation was king." [17]

    Drogba is renowned for performing in big games, with a goalscoring record at club level of 10 goals in 10 finals winning 10 trophies. [12] [13] Carl Anka writes, "Local derbies, top four six-pointers, title challenges or cup finals — if the game was big, Drogba got bigger". [17] Drogba was also capable of providing assists to his teammates. Between the 2009–10 and 2011–12 seasons, he managed 24 assists in the Premier League, with an average pass success rate of 61.4 percent, owing to his vision and creativity on the ball. [194] He provided 71 assists to teammates over the course of his entire career at Chelsea until May 2012, showing that he is also a team player. [195]

    Drogba was also known for his free kick ability where he would strike the ball with power and pace. Dr. Ken Bray of the University of Bath has described him as a specialist especially from central positions, and says that he "really just passes the ball very hard". He adds, "He hits it [the ball] very straight and appears to hit the ball with a very powerful side-foot action, almost like the technique used in a side-foot pass. Drogba's style is about beating the goalkeeper with speed and depth." [197] Bleacher Report states he adopted the "knuckle ball" technique developed by Juninho Pernambucano where the ball has almost no spinning motion during flight. [198] Drogba's trademark goal celebration saw him slide on his knees accompanied with an arm pump and a salute to fans – his celebration appears in EA Sports' FIFA video game. [161] [199]

    One of the greatest African players ever, Drogba is usually ranked among the three greatest African strikers, alongside George Weah and Samuel Eto'o. [189] [196] Drogba's diverse and robust playing style has seen him frequently cited as the toughest striker numerous defenders have had to face, these include Gerard Piqué, [200] Carles Puyol, [201] Chris Smalling, [202] Nemanja Vidić, [203] and Laurent Koscielny. [204]

    Drogba is married to Lalla Diakité, a Malian woman whom he met in Paris, and the couple have three children together. His eldest son, Isaac, was born in France in 1999, grew up in England and has played in the Chelsea academy system. [20] He signed for French club Guingamp in February 2018. [205] Drogba has two younger brothers who are also footballers: Joël and Freddy Drogba. Freddy, born in 1992, joined French Ligue 1 side Dijon FCO, and played for the youth team. [206] [207] [208] [209] He is a devout Roman Catholic. [210] [211] His uncle, Michel Goba, is also a professional footballer and Ivorian international, and his cousin Kévin Goba (Michel's son) is a professional footballer who played in the lower leagues of France. [212]

    —Carl Anka for the BBC, Didier Drogba was the 'clutch' centre-forward who united a nation. [17]

    Drogba is credited with playing a vital role in bringing peace to his country. [213] After the Ivory Coast qualified for the 2006 World Cup by defeating Sudan on 8 October 2005, Drogba made a desperate plea to the combatants, asking them to lay down their arms, a plea which was answered with a cease fire after five years of civil war. [17] Carl Anka writes, "torn by religious and political tensions, Drogba seized a unifying moment for his country and invited TV cameras into the Elephants changing room where he made a speech to the camera. The man spoke and a nation listened — the elections went off without bloodshed." [17] Drogba later helped move an African Cup of Nations qualifier to the rebel stronghold of Bouake a move that helped confirm the peace process. [214] On 24 January 2007, Drogba was appointed by the United Nations Development Programme (UNDP) as a Goodwill Ambassador. The UNDP were impressed with his previous charity work and believed that his high-profile would help raise awareness on African issues. [215] In September 2011, Drogba joined the Truth, Reconciliation and Dialogue Commission as a representative to help return peace to his home nation. [216] His involvement in the peace process led to Time magazine naming Drogba one of the world's 100 most influential people for 2010. [217]

    Drogba's charity work continued when, in late 2009, he announced he would be donating the £3 million signing on fee for his endorsement of Pepsi for the construction of a hospital in his hometown of Abidjan. [218] This work was done through Drogba's recently created "Didier Drogba Foundation" and Chelsea announced they too would donate the fee for the deal toward the Foundation's project. Drogba decided on building the hospital after a recent trip to the Ivorian capital's other hospitals, saying ". I decided the Foundation's first project should be to build and fund a hospital giving people basic healthcare and a chance just to stay alive." [218] The same year, Drogba teamed up with sportswear company Nike (whom he is sponsored by) and U2 frontman Bono on the eve of World AIDS Day to fight AIDS, Tuberculosis and Malaria. [219] Drogba said, "It's a big honour and pleasure for me to be linked with Bono and try to help him save some lives. AIDS and HIV is something that really destroyed Africa, and people don't really realise how easy it is to save lives — only two pills a day, which is 40 cents." [219]

    In November 2014, Drogba appeared in FIFA's "11 against Ebola" campaign with a selection of top football players from around the world, including Cristiano Ronaldo, Neymar, Gareth Bale and Xavi. [220] Under the slogan "Together, we can beat Ebola", FIFA's campaign was done in conjunction with the Confederation of African Football and health experts, with the players holding up eleven messages to raise awareness of the disease and ways to combat it. [220] On 22 February 2018, Drogba, former AC Milan striker and current Liberia President George Weah, and teenage French prodigy Kylian Mbappé had a meeting with French President Emmanuel Macron and FIFA President Gianni Infantino at the Élysée Palace in Paris that focused on a sports development project in Africa. [221] [222]

    As a UNDP Goodwill Ambassador, Drogba has taken part in the annual Match Against Poverty alongside Ronaldo and Zinedine Zidane. He has appeared in the 2012 and 2015 games. [223] Levallois Sporting Club, the amateur club where Drogba began his career, used their percentage of his transfer fees including £600,000 out of the £24 million paid when he joined Chelsea – first to ensure the club's survival, and then to improve their stadium to incorporate modern sports facilities for the benefit of the local community. They renamed the new stadium Stade Didier Drogba in his honour. [224] In June 2021, he received an honorary degree from RUSTA, due to his contributions to the growth of the game of football and restoration of stability in his home country. [225]


    Contents

    DD-1 to DD-444 [ edit | edit source ]

    USS Reuben James (DD-245)

    DD-445 to DD-997 [ edit | edit source ]

    USS Stephen Potter (DD-538)

    USS Charles Ausburne (DD-570)

    USS Wedderburn (DD-684)

    USS Aaron Ward (DM-34)

    USS Turner Joy (DD-951)

    USS Nicholson (DD-982)


    The move to London

    Whistler won considerable success in Paris when Symphony in White, No. 1: The White Girl (1862) was shown at the Salon des Refusés in 1863. This famous painting shows that if he was an exponent of realism, he was also attracted by the Pre-Raphaelite movement, which had begun in England in 1848.

    One of his chief claims to fame was his delight in the Japanese arts—then an avant-garde taste that, significantly, was to have many followers in his own country. Paintings such as The Princess from the Land of Porcelain (1863–65) and Caprice in Purple and Gold: The Golden Screen (1864) indicate his interest in the picturesque rather than the formal aspects of this style. Symphony in Grey and Green: The Ocean (1866), the result of a trip to Valparaíso, Chile, was, however, more Eastern in mood: the signature on this work is painted in an Eastern fashion. This style received its finest expression in Nocturne: Blue and Gold—Old Battersea Bridge (c. 1872–75). His appreciation of East Asian art was complemented by one for earthenware Tanagra figurines from Hellenistic Greece, and their elegant forms influenced his figure painting and drawing. Both the Asian and Hellenistic strains were blended in Six Projects, a series of highly coloured oil sketches.

    The 1860s and ’70s were especially creative for Whistler. It was then that he began to give musical titles to his paintings, using words such as symphony and harmony. In doing so he revealed a dependence on the theory of art for art’s sake, which esteemed music as the most abstract of the arts, and on the belief in the “correspondences” between the arts associated with Baudelaire and the French poet Théophile Gautier. It should be emphasized, however, that Whistler was not a lover of music for its own sake. During this period he started to paint his nocturnes—scenes of London, especially of Chelsea, that have poetic intensity and a fin de siècle flavour. These were based on memory or on pencil sketches. For them he evolved a special technique by which paint, in a very liquid state he called a sauce, was stroked onto the canvas in fast sweeps of the brush, somewhat in the manner of Japanese calligraphy.

    From the 1870s onward he was preoccupied by the problems of portrait painting, creating a number of masterpieces, including Arrangement in Grey and Black No. 1 (1871), Harmony in Grey and Green: Miss Cicely Alexander (1872–74), Arrangement in Grey and Black, No. 2 (1872–73 also called Thomas Carlyle), and Symphony in Flesh Color and Pink: Portrait of Mrs. Frances Leyland (1871–74), among others. These are paintings that underline his Aestheticism, his liking for simple forms and muted tones, and his attraction to the work of the 17th-century Spanish painter Diego Velázquez.

    Whistler touched the artistic life of his time at many points. He engaged in decorative work, as was shown by the stand he executed for the 1878 Paris exhibition (his collaborator was the architect Edward Godwin) and later his frieze for the Grosvenor Gallery in London. Above all, he painted the famous Harmony in Blue and Gold: The Peacock Room (1876–77) for No. 49 Prince’s Gate, London, the house of F.R. Leyland, a Liverpool shipping magnate. The decoration failed to please his patron, who felt Whistler had exceeded his commission, particularly in painting over some antique leather. The room was moved in 1919 to the Freer Gallery of Art. Whistler was also a force in book design.

    During these years in London he came to know many of the most interesting artists of the day—such as Dante Gabriel Rossetti and Albert Moore—and he was a high priest of bohemianism, living for long with Jo Hiffernan, an Irish woman who served as a model to Courbet as well as to Whistler. Although often short of money, he entertained considerably and was already becoming one of the most talked-of men in London.

    A change occurred in his life in 1877 when he brought a libel suit against John Ruskin, the celebrated writer on aesthetics, for the latter’s attack on Nocturne in Black and Gold, The Falling Rocket (1875). He won the case but received damages of only a farthing (the least valuable coin of the realm). The need to pay substantial costs occasioned his bankruptcy in 1879, and he was forced to move out of his charming home, the White House in Chelsea. He went to Venice with his mistress, Maud Franklin. He remained there for 14 months and soon became a centre of attraction among the many foreign artists who congregated in the city. He seldom painted in oils there, however, and spent most of his time producing pastels and watercolours, exquisite in their colouring. He had arrived with a commission to execute a series of etchings for the Fine Art Society. In all he made just more than 50 etchings of Venetian subjects, which are among the most striking graphic works of the time.

    His etchings won him success in London when exhibited upon his return in 1880 and in 1883. He continued to paint portraits—those of Pablo de Sarasate, Lady Archibald Campbell, Théodore Duret, and Comte Robert de Montesquiou-Fezensac are among the finest—but with increasing difficulty, as he was obsessed by the problem of achieving perfection.


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